Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

G.B.S. in Hellas: A Resource for Classicists

G.B.S. in Hellas: A Resource for Classicists Euripides I like, because he made the audience question things. --Bernard Shaw, "The Making of Plays" Beyond the indelible imprint Bernard Shaw has left on twentieth-century drama, his writings and ideas, his reputation and influence, have unobtrusively radiated into remote realms to a degree that he himself could hardly have envisioned. It is the penetration of his thought and works into one of these unlikely distant domains that this essay will attempt to probe. Shaw readily expressed his admiration for the rich legacy of the ancient Greek world. Acknowledgments of his indebtedness to that world are spread throughout his writings. On a variety of occasions he sang the praises of Aeschylus, Aristophanes, and Aristotle, while holding Sophocles in much lower esteem. But the Greeks for whom he felt a special affinity were Euripides and Plato, along with Socrates, Plato's teacher. Shaw's lifelong friendship with Gilbert Murray, Regius Professor of Greek at Oxford University, undoubtedly helped fuel his classic Hellenic interests, but those interests appear to have traversed a fairly independent course of their own. However, it is not the impact of the Greeks on Shaw that I will examine here. Rather, it is virtually the inverse: the role http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Penn State University Press

G.B.S. in Hellas: A Resource for Classicists

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies , Volume 23 (1)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/g-b-s-in-hellas-a-resource-for-classicists-hAN94l9dwb
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The Pennsylvania State University
ISSN
1529-1480
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Euripides I like, because he made the audience question things. --Bernard Shaw, "The Making of Plays" Beyond the indelible imprint Bernard Shaw has left on twentieth-century drama, his writings and ideas, his reputation and influence, have unobtrusively radiated into remote realms to a degree that he himself could hardly have envisioned. It is the penetration of his thought and works into one of these unlikely distant domains that this essay will attempt to probe. Shaw readily expressed his admiration for the rich legacy of the ancient Greek world. Acknowledgments of his indebtedness to that world are spread throughout his writings. On a variety of occasions he sang the praises of Aeschylus, Aristophanes, and Aristotle, while holding Sophocles in much lower esteem. But the Greeks for whom he felt a special affinity were Euripides and Plato, along with Socrates, Plato's teacher. Shaw's lifelong friendship with Gilbert Murray, Regius Professor of Greek at Oxford University, undoubtedly helped fuel his classic Hellenic interests, but those interests appear to have traversed a fairly independent course of their own. However, it is not the impact of the Greeks on Shaw that I will examine here. Rather, it is virtually the inverse: the role

Journal

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw StudiesPenn State University Press

There are no references for this article.