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From Underworld to Avant-Garde: Art and Criminology in Cuba and Brazil

From Underworld to Avant-Garde: Art and Criminology in Cuba and Brazil Rodrigo Lopes de Barros Oh, these new sciences, . . . these sciences that still speak the stammering language of hypothesis and have not liberated themselves from the power of imagination. They belong just as much to the poet as they do the scientist. What tremendous fresco remains not to be painted, . . . what colossal human comedy and tragedy to be written, . . . the material with which the question of heredity provides us seems infinite. --Emile Zola Genius is nothing but an extravagant manifestation of the body. --Arthur Cravan In his book, Música de feitiçaria no Brasil (Witchcraft Music in Brazil ), which begun as a lecture in 1933 and was published posthumously, Brazilian musicologist Mário de Andrade describes the protohistorical connection between Brazil and the island of Cuba.1 In other words, he traces the cosmogonical practices that culminated in macumba, Santeria, voodoo, and another variants of Afro-Latin American religions. He follows the path of the word "cuba" in Brazilian folklore, which acquired meanings that evolved from just "Cuban" to "powerful individual" and "sorcerer." Scouring the writings of Brazilian anthropologist Luís da Câmara Cascudo, Andrade tries to see the existence of "cuba" in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

From Underworld to Avant-Garde: Art and Criminology in Cuba and Brazil

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Penn State University Press
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Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
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1528-4212
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Abstract

Rodrigo Lopes de Barros Oh, these new sciences, . . . these sciences that still speak the stammering language of hypothesis and have not liberated themselves from the power of imagination. They belong just as much to the poet as they do the scientist. What tremendous fresco remains not to be painted, . . . what colossal human comedy and tragedy to be written, . . . the material with which the question of heredity provides us seems infinite. --Emile Zola Genius is nothing but an extravagant manifestation of the body. --Arthur Cravan In his book, Música de feitiçaria no Brasil (Witchcraft Music in Brazil ), which begun as a lecture in 1933 and was published posthumously, Brazilian musicologist Mário de Andrade describes the protohistorical connection between Brazil and the island of Cuba.1 In other words, he traces the cosmogonical practices that culminated in macumba, Santeria, voodoo, and another variants of Afro-Latin American religions. He follows the path of the word "cuba" in Brazilian folklore, which acquired meanings that evolved from just "Cuban" to "powerful individual" and "sorcerer." Scouring the writings of Brazilian anthropologist Luís da Câmara Cascudo, Andrade tries to see the existence of "cuba" in the

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: May 10, 2012

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