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Friedrich Nietzsche, der erste tragische Philosoph. Eine Entdeckung by Reto Winteler (review)

Friedrich Nietzsche, der erste tragische Philosoph. Eine Entdeckung by Reto Winteler (review) 444 | JOURNAL OF NIETZSCHE STUDIES This is an ingenious response, but the question that echoes behind it is still, for whom—or, for which perspective—is Nietzsche’s anthropological model better? As Gori himself points out, Nietzsche’s perspectivism can be preferable “only to those who agree with both the diagnosis and the prognosis” of European culture that he oer ff s (190 n. 53). On this point, Gori touches a raw nerve of Nietzsche’s late philosophy, which is probably destined to remain sensitive. aTh t said, Gori’s book can nonetheless be considered one of the most important contributions to the scholarship on perspectivism. Gori demonstrates a remarkable knowledge of Nietzsche’s published and unpub- lished works, as well as an admirable command of the secondary litera- ture on the subject—his claims are always presented with reference to the contemporary debates, as represented by English-language commentators like John Richardson, Maudemarie Clark, and Brian Leiter and by important German-language commentators, such as Günter Abel, Friedrich Kaulbach, and Volker Gerhard. The way in which he manages to demonstrate how close Nietzsche’s philosophy is to both the pragmatism of William James and the phenomenalism of Ernst Mach is convincing, and this is due partic- ularly to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Friedrich Nietzsche, der erste tragische Philosoph. Eine Entdeckung by Reto Winteler (review)

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

444 | JOURNAL OF NIETZSCHE STUDIES This is an ingenious response, but the question that echoes behind it is still, for whom—or, for which perspective—is Nietzsche’s anthropological model better? As Gori himself points out, Nietzsche’s perspectivism can be preferable “only to those who agree with both the diagnosis and the prognosis” of European culture that he oer ff s (190 n. 53). On this point, Gori touches a raw nerve of Nietzsche’s late philosophy, which is probably destined to remain sensitive. aTh t said, Gori’s book can nonetheless be considered one of the most important contributions to the scholarship on perspectivism. Gori demonstrates a remarkable knowledge of Nietzsche’s published and unpub- lished works, as well as an admirable command of the secondary litera- ture on the subject—his claims are always presented with reference to the contemporary debates, as represented by English-language commentators like John Richardson, Maudemarie Clark, and Brian Leiter and by important German-language commentators, such as Günter Abel, Friedrich Kaulbach, and Volker Gerhard. The way in which he manages to demonstrate how close Nietzsche’s philosophy is to both the pragmatism of William James and the phenomenalism of Ernst Mach is convincing, and this is due partic- ularly to

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 22, 2017

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