Forging a Consistent Vision: The People Who Shaped Manchester's Renewal, 1964–2014

Forging a Consistent Vision: The People Who Shaped Manchester's Renewal, 1964–2014 <p>abstract:</p><p>This article examines how Pittsburgh&apos;s Manchester neighborhood, a historic African American community located on the city&apos;s North Side, fought against macroeconomic forces and internal challenges to stabilize its population, improve its physical environment, and stimulate private investment over the course of fifty years, from 1964 through 2014. Manchester&apos;s transformation was the product of three key factors: (1) capacity in the form of strong, sustained leadership; (2) fealty to a long-term vision of the neighborhood as a stable and upwardly mobile African American community; and (3) control over land and resources, especially the involvement of the private sector, to bring the vision to life. These elements—leadership, vision, and resources—separated Manchester from other black neighborhoods as it became a national model for community revitalization over the course of fifty years.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies Penn State University Press

Forging a Consistent Vision: The People Who Shaped Manchester&apos;s Renewal, 1964–2014

Forging a Consistent Vision: The People Who Shaped Manchester&apos;s Renewal, 1964–2014

forging a consistent vision the people who shaped manchester’s renewal, 1964–2014 Dan Holland University of Pittsburgh abstra ct : This article examines how Pittsburgh’s Manchester neighborhood, a historic African American community located on the city’s North Side, fought against macroeconomic forces and internal challenges to stabilize its population, improve its physical environment, and stimulate private investment over the course of fifty years, from 1964 through 2014. Manchester’s transformation was the product of three key factors: (1) capacity in the form of strong, sustained leadership; (2) fealty to a long-term vision of the neighborhood as a stable and upwardly mobile African American community; and (3) control over land and resources, especially the involve- ment of the private sector, to bring the vision to life. These elements—leadership, vision, and resources—separated Manchester from other black neighborhoods as it became a national model for community revitalization over the course of fifty years. ke y w or ds: community reinvestment, Pittsburgh, Manchester, African American history, historic preservation, Stanley Lowe, It is a cold, sunny day on January 14, 2010. A crowd gathers on an aban- doned lot in Pittsburgh’s Manchester neighborhood for a groundbreaking. A host of dignitaries assembles and, with shovels in hand, take the ceremonial “first dig” of the project’s construction. Thirty-one houses will be built atop a 4.3-acre remediated brownfield, formerly an industrial site known as the American Electric Company and now renamed Columbus Square, by the Manchester Citizens Corporation (MCC). New homes will be constructed by Fourth River Development Company. Local banks, the city’s Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA), and state agencies financed the project. The new development is the crowning achievement for a neighborhood that fought for more than fifty years to beat back...
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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania Historical Association
ISSN
2153-2109

Abstract

<p>abstract:</p><p>This article examines how Pittsburgh&apos;s Manchester neighborhood, a historic African American community located on the city&apos;s North Side, fought against macroeconomic forces and internal challenges to stabilize its population, improve its physical environment, and stimulate private investment over the course of fifty years, from 1964 through 2014. Manchester&apos;s transformation was the product of three key factors: (1) capacity in the form of strong, sustained leadership; (2) fealty to a long-term vision of the neighborhood as a stable and upwardly mobile African American community; and (3) control over land and resources, especially the involvement of the private sector, to bring the vision to life. These elements—leadership, vision, and resources—separated Manchester from other black neighborhoods as it became a national model for community revitalization over the course of fifty years.</p>

Journal

Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Apr 11, 2019

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