Evidence, Authority, and Interpretation: A Response to Jason Helms

Evidence, Authority, and Interpretation: A Response to Jason Helms As someone with a long-standing interest in Heraclitus, I am delighted that Philosophy and Rhetoric is providing a forum for an ongoing discussion of his work.1 Although Jason Helms and I do disagree on specific matters concerning Heraclitean interpretation, we are, I think, in full agreement concerning the importance of Heraclitus for both rhetorical and philosophical studies and intend these essays as contributions to what, it is hoped, will be a fruitful ongoing discussion of Heraclitus within the interdisciplinary tradition of this journal. Rather than address many minor points of disagreement superficially, I will concentrate below on close analysis of a few specific issues that I consider paradigmatic of differences in method rather than merely in conclusions. PANTA RHEI (all things flow) That Heraclitus was interested in establishing any sense of orthoepia plays down his insistence on the panta rhei (everything flows). To suggest any final rightness of words would suggest that everything flows but the Logos. (Helms, this issue) Actually, I do not use the phrase "final rightness of words" but, rather, describe Heraclitus as "focus[ing] on the problem of correctness of names" and as Philosophy and Rhetoric, Vol. 41, No. 3, 2008 Copyright © 2008 The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy and Rhetoric Penn State University Press

Evidence, Authority, and Interpretation: A Response to Jason Helms

Philosophy and Rhetoric, Volume 41 (3) – Sep 17, 2008

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University
ISSN
1527-2079
Publisher site
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Abstract

As someone with a long-standing interest in Heraclitus, I am delighted that Philosophy and Rhetoric is providing a forum for an ongoing discussion of his work.1 Although Jason Helms and I do disagree on specific matters concerning Heraclitean interpretation, we are, I think, in full agreement concerning the importance of Heraclitus for both rhetorical and philosophical studies and intend these essays as contributions to what, it is hoped, will be a fruitful ongoing discussion of Heraclitus within the interdisciplinary tradition of this journal. Rather than address many minor points of disagreement superficially, I will concentrate below on close analysis of a few specific issues that I consider paradigmatic of differences in method rather than merely in conclusions. PANTA RHEI (all things flow) That Heraclitus was interested in establishing any sense of orthoepia plays down his insistence on the panta rhei (everything flows). To suggest any final rightness of words would suggest that everything flows but the Logos. (Helms, this issue) Actually, I do not use the phrase "final rightness of words" but, rather, describe Heraclitus as "focus[ing] on the problem of correctness of names" and as Philosophy and Rhetoric, Vol. 41, No. 3, 2008 Copyright © 2008 The

Journal

Philosophy and RhetoricPenn State University Press

Published: Sep 17, 2008

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