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Eternal Return and the Problem of the Constitution of Identity

Eternal Return and the Problem of the Constitution of Identity 020 Cooke (16-34) 3/21/05 12:12 PM Page 16 Eternal Return and the Problem of the Constitution of Identity Alexander Cooke The basic conception of the work, the idea of eternal recurrence, the highest for- mula of affirmation that can possibly be attained—belongs to the August of the year 1881: it was jotted down on a piece of paper with the inscription: “6000 feet beyond man and time.” I was that day walking through the woods beside the lake of Silvaplana; I stopped beside a mighty pyramidal block of stone which reared itself up not far from Surlei. Then this idea came to me. —Nietzsche, Ecce Homo Introduction: Nietzsche and the Doctrine of the Eternal Return he doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same presents itself as both the T most problematic and difficult aspect of Nietzsche’s philosophy. While described above, and in other letters of Nietzsche’s surrounding the month of August 1881 (see Klossowski, 1997, 55–56), as the “highest formula of affir- mation,” in The Gay Science, written during the same period, the same thought is communicated as the heaviest burden: The heaviest burden.—What if a demon crept after you one day or night in your loneliest solitude http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Eternal Return and the Problem of the Constitution of Identity

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 29 (1) – May 9, 2005

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The Friedrich Nietzsche Society.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

020 Cooke (16-34) 3/21/05 12:12 PM Page 16 Eternal Return and the Problem of the Constitution of Identity Alexander Cooke The basic conception of the work, the idea of eternal recurrence, the highest for- mula of affirmation that can possibly be attained—belongs to the August of the year 1881: it was jotted down on a piece of paper with the inscription: “6000 feet beyond man and time.” I was that day walking through the woods beside the lake of Silvaplana; I stopped beside a mighty pyramidal block of stone which reared itself up not far from Surlei. Then this idea came to me. —Nietzsche, Ecce Homo Introduction: Nietzsche and the Doctrine of the Eternal Return he doctrine of the eternal recurrence of the same presents itself as both the T most problematic and difficult aspect of Nietzsche’s philosophy. While described above, and in other letters of Nietzsche’s surrounding the month of August 1881 (see Klossowski, 1997, 55–56), as the “highest formula of affir- mation,” in The Gay Science, written during the same period, the same thought is communicated as the heaviest burden: The heaviest burden.—What if a demon crept after you one day or night in your loneliest solitude

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: May 9, 2005

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