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Editorial Foreword

Editorial Foreword 000 FM 28-04 (c-2) 10/27/04 12:48 PM Page 1 his issue of the Journal of Nietzsche Studies examines Nietzsche’s thought Tthrough the multiple lenses of comparative, or cross-cultural, philosophy. Building upon Graham Parkes’s pioneering anthology, Nietzsche and Asian Thought (Chicago, 1991), as well as a rapidly growing body of subsequent schol- arship, the essays collected here attempt a kind of Auseinandersetzung between Nietzsche and various non-Western philosophical traditions. The first three contributions focus primarily on Nietzsche’s knowledge and use of Asian philosophies, and the ways in which he has in turn been interpreted and appropriated in contemporary Asian thought. In the opening essay, Thomas Brobjer draws upon his extensive research in Nietzsche’s library to offer the most comprehensive account yet of Nietzsche’s readings on Asian thought. David Smith focuses in particular on Nietzsche’s acquaintance with the Laws of Manu and Hinduism, illuminating the way in which his knowledge of India was mediated by the unscholarly popularizations of Louis Jacolliot. Hans-Georg Moeller turns his attention to more contemporary developments, tracing the emergence of various “Sino-Nietzscheanisms” in both China and Europe, with particular attention paid to Chen Guying, one of the foremost living Daoist thinkers. The last three essays all pursue http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 The Friedrich Nietzsche Society.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

000 FM 28-04 (c-2) 10/27/04 12:48 PM Page 1 his issue of the Journal of Nietzsche Studies examines Nietzsche’s thought Tthrough the multiple lenses of comparative, or cross-cultural, philosophy. Building upon Graham Parkes’s pioneering anthology, Nietzsche and Asian Thought (Chicago, 1991), as well as a rapidly growing body of subsequent schol- arship, the essays collected here attempt a kind of Auseinandersetzung between Nietzsche and various non-Western philosophical traditions. The first three contributions focus primarily on Nietzsche’s knowledge and use of Asian philosophies, and the ways in which he has in turn been interpreted and appropriated in contemporary Asian thought. In the opening essay, Thomas Brobjer draws upon his extensive research in Nietzsche’s library to offer the most comprehensive account yet of Nietzsche’s readings on Asian thought. David Smith focuses in particular on Nietzsche’s acquaintance with the Laws of Manu and Hinduism, illuminating the way in which his knowledge of India was mediated by the unscholarly popularizations of Louis Jacolliot. Hans-Georg Moeller turns his attention to more contemporary developments, tracing the emergence of various “Sino-Nietzscheanisms” in both China and Europe, with particular attention paid to Chen Guying, one of the foremost living Daoist thinkers. The last three essays all pursue

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 29, 2004

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