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Editorial Foreword

Editorial Foreword Nietzsche/26/3RD/new 11/20/03 12:50 PM Page e This special issue on Nietzsche and postanalytic philosophy arises from a conference of that title at the University of Southampton in 1999 organized by the Friedrich Nietzsche Society in conjunction with the Centre for Post- Analytic Philosophy. The primary purpose of this conference was to explore Nietzsche’s relevance for contemporary postanalytic philosophy, a purpose that itself immediately raises not only issues of Nietzsche interpretation but also the issue of how to construe the idea of postanalytic philosophy. David Cooper’s essay directly addresses the latter issue in characterizing what he terms “the analytical ambition” as the view that philosophy is to disclose the structure of thought, the rules that govern the production of intelligible speech and of which speakers are held to exhibit implicit mastery. Drawing out the salient features of this ambition, Cooper articulates a view of Nietzsche as posing a serious philosophical challenge to the cogency of this ambition in arguing that this rule model is neither a necessary presupposition of explain- ing our linguistic practices nor, in the end, a sustainable picture of concep- tual understanding. It is a feature of Cooper’s characterization of the analytical ambition and, hence, of postanalytic philosophy that both the later Wittgenstein and Heidegger belong to this camp. The essays by Bowles, Campbell, and Turanli take up Nietzsche’s relationship to postanalytic philosophy through engage- ments with these later thinkers. Bowles and Campbell focus on the issue of meaning; Bowles compares Nietzsche and Wittgenstein on meaning and Campbell constructs a dialogue between Nietzsche and Heidegger on mean- ing that explores their similarities and differences. Turanli takes up Nietzsche and Wittgenstein in terms of their rejection of the craving for generality that characterizes metaphysical philosophy and argues that Nietzsche provides an account of how this craving arises. The final two essays involve a turn to ethics and set out contrasting argu- ments. Thomas Brobjer provides a perspicuous overview of Nietzsche’s eth- ical thinking in terms of his commitment to an ethics of virtue and indicates some of the implications of this commitment for Nietzsche’s modes of argu- ment. Nicole Anderson takes up the issue of play in Nietzsche and Derrida by way of a consideration of perspectivism, ‘différance’, and subjectivity in order to explore its ethical possibilities. These essays indicate the diverse ways in which Nietzsche’s philosophy can inform contemporary modes of ethical reflection. David Owen Department of Politics University of Southampton http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Editorial Foreword

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 26 (1) – Jun 12, 2004

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by The Friedrich Nietzsche Society.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

Nietzsche/26/3RD/new 11/20/03 12:50 PM Page e This special issue on Nietzsche and postanalytic philosophy arises from a conference of that title at the University of Southampton in 1999 organized by the Friedrich Nietzsche Society in conjunction with the Centre for Post- Analytic Philosophy. The primary purpose of this conference was to explore Nietzsche’s relevance for contemporary postanalytic philosophy, a purpose that itself immediately raises not only issues of Nietzsche interpretation but also the issue of how to construe the idea of postanalytic philosophy. David Cooper’s essay directly addresses the latter issue in characterizing what he terms “the analytical ambition” as the view that philosophy is to disclose the structure of thought, the rules that govern the production of intelligible speech and of which speakers are held to exhibit implicit mastery. Drawing out the salient features of this ambition, Cooper articulates a view of Nietzsche as posing a serious philosophical challenge to the cogency of this ambition in arguing that this rule model is neither a necessary presupposition of explain- ing our linguistic practices nor, in the end, a sustainable picture of concep- tual understanding. It is a feature of Cooper’s characterization of the analytical ambition and, hence, of postanalytic philosophy that both the later Wittgenstein and Heidegger belong to this camp. The essays by Bowles, Campbell, and Turanli take up Nietzsche’s relationship to postanalytic philosophy through engage- ments with these later thinkers. Bowles and Campbell focus on the issue of meaning; Bowles compares Nietzsche and Wittgenstein on meaning and Campbell constructs a dialogue between Nietzsche and Heidegger on mean- ing that explores their similarities and differences. Turanli takes up Nietzsche and Wittgenstein in terms of their rejection of the craving for generality that characterizes metaphysical philosophy and argues that Nietzsche provides an account of how this craving arises. The final two essays involve a turn to ethics and set out contrasting argu- ments. Thomas Brobjer provides a perspicuous overview of Nietzsche’s eth- ical thinking in terms of his commitment to an ethics of virtue and indicates some of the implications of this commitment for Nietzsche’s modes of argu- ment. Nicole Anderson takes up the issue of play in Nietzsche and Derrida by way of a consideration of perspectivism, ‘différance’, and subjectivity in order to explore its ethical possibilities. These essays indicate the diverse ways in which Nietzsche’s philosophy can inform contemporary modes of ethical reflection. David Owen Department of Politics University of Southampton

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jun 12, 2004

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