Editor’s Introduction

Editor’s Introduction trygve thr o nveit What is democracy? Is it a form, or a quality? A process, or a goal? A type of government, or a relation between government and governed and among the governed themselves? Is it “a” thing at all, or is it thoroughly plural—not just historically or demographically, but logically, morally, and m - etaphys ically? Finally, whatever its essential nature, is democracy a gen-uine pos sibility that actual communities can realize given enough hard work and thinking? Or is it merely a rhetorical device for eliciting, from the powerful, the bare minimum of justice required to forestall chaos? In a variety of ways—some complementary, some (at least apparently) contradictory—all the contributors to this voleTh um Good e o S f ociety question the dichotomies invoked above. Ana Romero-Iribas and Graham Smith draw on other students of the ancient Greek conception of “political friendship” to complicate the role of “reciprocity” in democratic societies. Romero-Iribas and Smith do not deny the value of what historian J ames T. Kloppenberg identifies as democracy’s foundational “rationale” for “treating all persons with respect,” and for “extend[ing] the category of those deserving consideration beyond the small body of citizens” in our familiar http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Editor’s Introduction

The Good Society, Volume 27 (1) – Dec 17, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/editor-s-introduction-PxMeWteO04
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-9731

Abstract

trygve thr o nveit What is democracy? Is it a form, or a quality? A process, or a goal? A type of government, or a relation between government and governed and among the governed themselves? Is it “a” thing at all, or is it thoroughly plural—not just historically or demographically, but logically, morally, and m - etaphys ically? Finally, whatever its essential nature, is democracy a gen-uine pos sibility that actual communities can realize given enough hard work and thinking? Or is it merely a rhetorical device for eliciting, from the powerful, the bare minimum of justice required to forestall chaos? In a variety of ways—some complementary, some (at least apparently) contradictory—all the contributors to this voleTh um Good e o S f ociety question the dichotomies invoked above. Ana Romero-Iribas and Graham Smith draw on other students of the ancient Greek conception of “political friendship” to complicate the role of “reciprocity” in democratic societies. Romero-Iribas and Smith do not deny the value of what historian J ames T. Kloppenberg identifies as democracy’s foundational “rationale” for “treating all persons with respect,” and for “extend[ing] the category of those deserving consideration beyond the small body of citizens” in our familiar

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Dec 17, 2019

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month