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"Don't Quote Me on That!": Wilamowitz Contra Nietzsche in 1872 and 1873

"Don't Quote Me on That!": Wilamowitz Contra Nietzsche in 1872 and 1873 Abstract: This article examines an oddity that has gone unnoticed since Nietzsche first pointed it out to his friend and confidant Erwin Rohde in 1872—namely, that Wilamowitz, in his attack on The Birth of Tragedy , systematically misquotes Nietzsche. A large number of the quotations from The Birth of Tragedy by Wilamowitz in both installments of Zukunftsphilologie! are pseudo-quotations—whether they are off by a word or more or whether they are a collage of phrases drawn freely from Nietzsche's vocabulary. This essay revisits the debate from the angle of nineteenth-century philology in its relation to textual authority (both primary and secondary). A complete of Wilamowitz's misquotations from The Birth of Tragedy and from Rohde's Afterphilologie lays out, for the first time, this evidence of the practices of the first Nietzschean philologist in history, Wilamowitz himself. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

"Don't Quote Me on That!": Wilamowitz Contra Nietzsche in 1872 and 1873

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 42 (1) – Nov 4, 2011

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
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Copyright © Penn State University Press
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1538-4594
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Abstract

Abstract: This article examines an oddity that has gone unnoticed since Nietzsche first pointed it out to his friend and confidant Erwin Rohde in 1872—namely, that Wilamowitz, in his attack on The Birth of Tragedy , systematically misquotes Nietzsche. A large number of the quotations from The Birth of Tragedy by Wilamowitz in both installments of Zukunftsphilologie! are pseudo-quotations—whether they are off by a word or more or whether they are a collage of phrases drawn freely from Nietzsche's vocabulary. This essay revisits the debate from the angle of nineteenth-century philology in its relation to textual authority (both primary and secondary). A complete of Wilamowitz's misquotations from The Birth of Tragedy and from Rohde's Afterphilologie lays out, for the first time, this evidence of the practices of the first Nietzschean philologist in history, Wilamowitz himself.

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 4, 2011

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