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Did Eichmann Think?

Did Eichmann Think? ro ger b erkow i t z A review of Eichman Before Jerusalem: the Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer, Bettina Stangneth (New York: Random House), 2014. "Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer," is the new English translation of Bettina Stangneth's exhaustive history of the life of Adolf Eichmann. Her book is essential reading for anyone who wishes to try to understand Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi lieutenant colonel who was responsible for the logistics of the Holocaust. Stangneth has pieced together the scattered transcripts of the interviews Eichmann gave with the Dutch Nazi Willem Sassen in multiple archives; she has tracked down full essays and fragments of Eichmann's own writing in mislabeled files that have never been considered before; and above all, she has pieced together the written record of Eichmann's life with a diligence and obsessiveness that is uncanny and likely never to be repeated. Stangneth knows more about Adolf Eichmann than any other person alive and probably more than any person in history, past or future. Stangneth writes that her book has two aims. The first is "to present all the available material, as well as the challenges that come with it." http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Did Eichmann Think?

The Good Society , Volume 23 (2) – Jan 22, 2014

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

ro ger b erkow i t z A review of Eichman Before Jerusalem: the Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer, Bettina Stangneth (New York: Random House), 2014. "Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer," is the new English translation of Bettina Stangneth's exhaustive history of the life of Adolf Eichmann. Her book is essential reading for anyone who wishes to try to understand Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi lieutenant colonel who was responsible for the logistics of the Holocaust. Stangneth has pieced together the scattered transcripts of the interviews Eichmann gave with the Dutch Nazi Willem Sassen in multiple archives; she has tracked down full essays and fragments of Eichmann's own writing in mislabeled files that have never been considered before; and above all, she has pieced together the written record of Eichmann's life with a diligence and obsessiveness that is uncanny and likely never to be repeated. Stangneth knows more about Adolf Eichmann than any other person alive and probably more than any person in history, past or future. Stangneth writes that her book has two aims. The first is "to present all the available material, as well as the challenges that come with it."

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Jan 22, 2014

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