Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Der Antichrist und der Gekreuzigte: Friedrich Nietzsches letzte Texte by Heinrich Detering (review)

Der Antichrist und der Gekreuzigte: Friedrich Nietzsches letzte Texte by Heinrich Detering (review) and laws. Niemeyer points out that Nietzsche sets this task for all humans (172, 174­75). But he also emphasizes that by manipulating Nietzsche's texts his sister again eliminated this general anthropological concept in favor of a racist connotation, such that, ironically, the idea of the Übermensch contributed decisively to Nietzsche's Nazification. Niemeyer concludes by giving a more concrete characterization of the concept of the Übermensch. He first underlines one main difference from previous (Christian-moral) educational concepts: the psychological inclusion of the bodily and animal nature of man, no longer understood as a purely rational being. Niemeyer then discusses the opposition that the concept of the Übermensch expresses to occidental-Christian morality, which not only has an inadequate conception of man, but also does not tolerate any deviation from its dogma. In contrast, Niemeyer claims, the Übermensch distinguishes himself by a basic honest openness in the face of the unknown and the other, also in himself. For Niemeyer, the Übermensch is thus man's recuperation of his nature and of the potential of world- and self-framing which lies therein, something especially desirable in the twenty-first century (189). With this discussion of the Übermensch, Niemeyer completes his series of "corrections" to negative http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Der Antichrist und der Gekreuzigte: Friedrich Nietzsches letzte Texte by Heinrich Detering (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 44 (3) – Jan 9, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/der-antichrist-und-der-gekreuzigte-friedrich-nietzsches-letzte-texte-0NOkPwIRQQ
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

and laws. Niemeyer points out that Nietzsche sets this task for all humans (172, 174­75). But he also emphasizes that by manipulating Nietzsche's texts his sister again eliminated this general anthropological concept in favor of a racist connotation, such that, ironically, the idea of the Übermensch contributed decisively to Nietzsche's Nazification. Niemeyer concludes by giving a more concrete characterization of the concept of the Übermensch. He first underlines one main difference from previous (Christian-moral) educational concepts: the psychological inclusion of the bodily and animal nature of man, no longer understood as a purely rational being. Niemeyer then discusses the opposition that the concept of the Übermensch expresses to occidental-Christian morality, which not only has an inadequate conception of man, but also does not tolerate any deviation from its dogma. In contrast, Niemeyer claims, the Übermensch distinguishes himself by a basic honest openness in the face of the unknown and the other, also in himself. For Niemeyer, the Übermensch is thus man's recuperation of his nature and of the potential of world- and self-framing which lies therein, something especially desirable in the twenty-first century (189). With this discussion of the Übermensch, Niemeyer completes his series of "corrections" to negative

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jan 9, 2013

There are no references for this article.