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Counterfeit Capital: Poetic Labor and Revolutionary Irony (review)

Counterfeit Capital: Poetic Labor and Revolutionary Irony (review) book ReviewS approach, re-presenting the process of thinking through the problem as beizer revisits earlier assumptions and reexamines earlier positions and readings. The resulting juxtaposition of methods and approaches serves her attempt to devise alternative methodologies. it also remains exploratory, gesturing toward what the writing of women's life lines should be rather than defining what ultimately is still "a broad ethical and aesthetic shift that has yet to come" (211). Liedeke Plate Radboud University Nijmegen Counterfeit Capital: Poetic Labor and Revolutionary Irony. by Jennifer bajorek. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2009. 154 pages. Cloth $50.00. Counterfeit Capital examines the pervasiveness of the trope or mode of irony in nineteenth-century responses to capitalism's perfusion of the socioeconomy. The book's two principal foci are baudelaire and Marx. Two studies that partially parallel bajorek's would be Debarati Sanyal's Violence and Modernity and Jeffrey Mehlman's Revolution and Repetition. but only partially. bajorek's study is more concertedly focused on irony than they are. Ultimately the progenitor of studies in any of these areas is walter benjamin, who is attended to and sometimes contested in bajorek's book. bajorek's critical examination of benjamin's views on baudelaire in her final chapter is particularly original and, i http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Counterfeit Capital: Poetic Labor and Revolutionary Irony (review)

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 48 (4) – Jan 1, 2011

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1528-4212
Publisher site
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Abstract

book ReviewS approach, re-presenting the process of thinking through the problem as beizer revisits earlier assumptions and reexamines earlier positions and readings. The resulting juxtaposition of methods and approaches serves her attempt to devise alternative methodologies. it also remains exploratory, gesturing toward what the writing of women's life lines should be rather than defining what ultimately is still "a broad ethical and aesthetic shift that has yet to come" (211). Liedeke Plate Radboud University Nijmegen Counterfeit Capital: Poetic Labor and Revolutionary Irony. by Jennifer bajorek. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2009. 154 pages. Cloth $50.00. Counterfeit Capital examines the pervasiveness of the trope or mode of irony in nineteenth-century responses to capitalism's perfusion of the socioeconomy. The book's two principal foci are baudelaire and Marx. Two studies that partially parallel bajorek's would be Debarati Sanyal's Violence and Modernity and Jeffrey Mehlman's Revolution and Repetition. but only partially. bajorek's study is more concertedly focused on irony than they are. Ultimately the progenitor of studies in any of these areas is walter benjamin, who is attended to and sometimes contested in bajorek's book. bajorek's critical examination of benjamin's views on baudelaire in her final chapter is particularly original and, i

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2011

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