Comment on Ian Shapiro's Democratic Justice

Comment on Ian Shapiro's Democratic Justice BOOKS IN REVIEW There is a tendency among some recent theorists of democratize, without sabotaging, those hierarchies needed to serve valracy to write as if what they advocate is a set of procedures for ued social ends. deciding collective norms democratically, when in fact what they With respect to justice, rather than attempt a comprehensive argue for is a subset of democratic decisions that yield outcomes argument about "what justice requires," Shapiro adopts the more they regard as just. Theorists exhibit this tendency in various modest aim of identifying ways to eliminate or at least to reduce ways. Some declare the outcomes they prefer to be prerequisites injustice, defined in terms of violations of people's basic interfor authentically democratic decision-making. Others define as ests. He demonstrates in a series of applications of the argument "unreasonable" views likely to produce results they consider (to parent-child relations, adult domestic relations, relations in unjust. Still others wish away the very possibility that the prothe workplace, and relations involving the dependent elderly) cedures they recommend might yield decisions they find unpalatthat to reduce injustice thus understood would require signifiable. The trouble with this style of argument is not only that it cant http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Comment on Ian Shapiro's Democratic Justice

The Good Society, Volume 11 (2) – Mar 12, 2002

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 The Good Society.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOKS IN REVIEW There is a tendency among some recent theorists of democratize, without sabotaging, those hierarchies needed to serve valracy to write as if what they advocate is a set of procedures for ued social ends. deciding collective norms democratically, when in fact what they With respect to justice, rather than attempt a comprehensive argue for is a subset of democratic decisions that yield outcomes argument about "what justice requires," Shapiro adopts the more they regard as just. Theorists exhibit this tendency in various modest aim of identifying ways to eliminate or at least to reduce ways. Some declare the outcomes they prefer to be prerequisites injustice, defined in terms of violations of people's basic interfor authentically democratic decision-making. Others define as ests. He demonstrates in a series of applications of the argument "unreasonable" views likely to produce results they consider (to parent-child relations, adult domestic relations, relations in unjust. Still others wish away the very possibility that the prothe workplace, and relations involving the dependent elderly) cedures they recommend might yield decisions they find unpalatthat to reduce injustice thus understood would require signifiable. The trouble with this style of argument is not only that it cant

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 12, 2002

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