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Civil Society, Philanthropy, and Institutions of Care

Civil Society, Philanthropy, and Institutions of Care Gus diZerega The word "philanthropy" elicits images of the wealthy using work, x-rays, and other tests without charge to patients. A retired their bounty establishing scholarships or contributing to institudoctor visits physicians in the area, collecting sample medications tions helping the poor to assist the less fortunate. Or perhaps they have been sent, but will not use. A nurse checks on patients to employing their riches to endow art museums, libraries, museums make sure they suffer no unexpected side effects, as well as servand public art, enabling others to enjoy values otherwise undering other post visit needs. supplied. These philanthropic examples are certainly appropriate, While people sending in monetary donations are clearly pracbut by themselves they are misleading, for they suggest love of ticing philanthropy, so are the volunteers providing medical humanity -- phil-anthropy -- is the exclusive preserve of sociservices, space, and other necessary services. Each of these nonety's most fortunate. Humankind, upon which the philanthropists monetary donations could be replaced by a monetary one exercise their beneficence, constitutes a enabling the center to hire out these relatively passive and needy target of services. Limiting philanthropy to I want to offer a different analysis of their Olympian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Civil Society, Philanthropy, and Institutions of Care

The Good Society , Volume 15 (1) – Jan 3, 2006

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

Gus diZerega The word "philanthropy" elicits images of the wealthy using work, x-rays, and other tests without charge to patients. A retired their bounty establishing scholarships or contributing to institudoctor visits physicians in the area, collecting sample medications tions helping the poor to assist the less fortunate. Or perhaps they have been sent, but will not use. A nurse checks on patients to employing their riches to endow art museums, libraries, museums make sure they suffer no unexpected side effects, as well as servand public art, enabling others to enjoy values otherwise undering other post visit needs. supplied. These philanthropic examples are certainly appropriate, While people sending in monetary donations are clearly pracbut by themselves they are misleading, for they suggest love of ticing philanthropy, so are the volunteers providing medical humanity -- phil-anthropy -- is the exclusive preserve of sociservices, space, and other necessary services. Each of these nonety's most fortunate. Humankind, upon which the philanthropists monetary donations could be replaced by a monetary one exercise their beneficence, constitutes a enabling the center to hire out these relatively passive and needy target of services. Limiting philanthropy to I want to offer a different analysis of their Olympian

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Jan 3, 2006

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