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"Chinese" Intextuations of the World

"Chinese" Intextuations of the World Andrea Bachner [If I knew a dictionary I would love it without surcease love its order that lets nothing escape from its crammed pages love that it calls out the names of all things with or without form love its warped cover and its twine-peeling spine when I close it love that it holds innumerable keys without one needing a keyhole or having to open the door nor acknowledge anything behind the door I love reading the many divergent meanings of every unknown word and forget my own complexity I love its ignorance] Hong Hong, "" ("Yu wo wuguan de dongxi") ["Things That Have Nothing to Do with Me"] Wor(l)ding What if we understood world literature in its most radical sense? What if we read literary texts not as merely in this world, nor as mere representations comparative literature studies, vol. 47, no. 3, 2010. Copyright © 2010 The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA. of the world, nor as only tools for mapping intercultural flows and circulations? What if we espoused, instead, a view that repositioned world literature as of this world? As neither contained in the world, nor as creating a more or less faithful mirror http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

"Chinese" Intextuations of the World

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 47 (3) – Oct 16, 2010

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Penn State University Press
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Copyright © Penn State University Press
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1528-4212
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Abstract

Andrea Bachner [If I knew a dictionary I would love it without surcease love its order that lets nothing escape from its crammed pages love that it calls out the names of all things with or without form love its warped cover and its twine-peeling spine when I close it love that it holds innumerable keys without one needing a keyhole or having to open the door nor acknowledge anything behind the door I love reading the many divergent meanings of every unknown word and forget my own complexity I love its ignorance] Hong Hong, "" ("Yu wo wuguan de dongxi") ["Things That Have Nothing to Do with Me"] Wor(l)ding What if we understood world literature in its most radical sense? What if we read literary texts not as merely in this world, nor as mere representations comparative literature studies, vol. 47, no. 3, 2010. Copyright © 2010 The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA. of the world, nor as only tools for mapping intercultural flows and circulations? What if we espoused, instead, a view that repositioned world literature as of this world? As neither contained in the world, nor as creating a more or less faithful mirror

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Oct 16, 2010

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