Captain Cook and the Discovery of Antartica's Modern Specificity: Towards a Critique of Globalism

Captain Cook and the Discovery of Antartica's Modern Specificity: Towards a Critique of Globalism A. OWEN ALDRIDGE PRIZE WINNER 2005 CAPTAIN COOK AND THE DISCOVERY OF ANTARCTICA'S MODERN SPECIFICITY: TOWARDS A CRITIQUE OF GLOBALIZATION Mariano Siskind "Antarctica is the last great journey left to Man" --Ernest Shackleton One can affirm that by the end of Captain James Cook's first circumnavigation of the world, in July 1771, almost every region of the Globe had been discovered, explored, charted and was being incorporated into what the colonial powers conceived as the world. There was still Terra Australis Incognita, or the Southern Continent (as Antarctica was referred to), the only space on Earth still absolutely virgin, unexplored, undiscovered. On August 2nd 1773, after having been the first man to cross the Antarctic Circle during the previous summer, but unable to land on Antarctic soil, Cook wrote on his journal about the need for exploring Antarctica and its seas: Having now crossed or got to the north of Captain Carteret's Track [near Tahiti], no discovery of importance can be made, some few islands is all that can be expected while I remain within the Tropical Seas. As I have now in this and my former Voyage crossed this Ocean from 40° South and upward it will http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Captain Cook and the Discovery of Antartica's Modern Specificity: Towards a Critique of Globalism

Comparative Literature Studies, Volume 42 (1) – May 17, 2005

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1528-4212
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Abstract

A. OWEN ALDRIDGE PRIZE WINNER 2005 CAPTAIN COOK AND THE DISCOVERY OF ANTARCTICA'S MODERN SPECIFICITY: TOWARDS A CRITIQUE OF GLOBALIZATION Mariano Siskind "Antarctica is the last great journey left to Man" --Ernest Shackleton One can affirm that by the end of Captain James Cook's first circumnavigation of the world, in July 1771, almost every region of the Globe had been discovered, explored, charted and was being incorporated into what the colonial powers conceived as the world. There was still Terra Australis Incognita, or the Southern Continent (as Antarctica was referred to), the only space on Earth still absolutely virgin, unexplored, undiscovered. On August 2nd 1773, after having been the first man to cross the Antarctic Circle during the previous summer, but unable to land on Antarctic soil, Cook wrote on his journal about the need for exploring Antarctica and its seas: Having now crossed or got to the north of Captain Carteret's Track [near Tahiti], no discovery of importance can be made, some few islands is all that can be expected while I remain within the Tropical Seas. As I have now in this and my former Voyage crossed this Ocean from 40° South and upward it will

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: May 17, 2005

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