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Bodily Arts: Rhetoric and Athletics in Ancient Greece (review)

Bodily Arts: Rhetoric and Athletics in Ancient Greece (review) Bodily Arts: Rhetoric and Athletics in Ancient Greece by Debra Hawhee Austin: University of Texas Press, 2004. Pp. xiv + 226. $40.00, hardcover. In Bodily Arts, Debra Hawhee constructs an often compelling, always interesting case for the conceptual and material linkages between the ancient arts of rhetoric and athletics. In so doing, Hawhee also highlights the integral role of the musical arts to rhetorical and athletic training. Throughout the book, Hawhee weaves together close readings of multiple texts (poetry, oratory, sculpture, painting, architecture) in order to illuminate the intricate "network of overlapping practices" that connect the bodies of rhetoric, athletes, and musicians in Ancient Greece. To this reader, the central strengths of the study are methodological as well as conceptual. In terms of method, Hawhee carefully and with studied finesse integrates close readings of visual, spatial, and verbal texts and practices. In the wrong hands, this type of endeavor can easily appear as the worst kind of pastiche. Not so in this case where Hawhee manages the textual interpretation with deft expertise. Conceptually, the central premise that rhetoric was a practice that was fully embodied and, most importantly, that embodiment was not in a hierarchical relation to reason, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy and Rhetoric Penn State University Press

Bodily Arts: Rhetoric and Athletics in Ancient Greece (review)

Philosophy and Rhetoric , Volume 42 (2) – May 15, 2009

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
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Copyright © Penn State University Press
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1527-2079
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Abstract

Bodily Arts: Rhetoric and Athletics in Ancient Greece by Debra Hawhee Austin: University of Texas Press, 2004. Pp. xiv + 226. $40.00, hardcover. In Bodily Arts, Debra Hawhee constructs an often compelling, always interesting case for the conceptual and material linkages between the ancient arts of rhetoric and athletics. In so doing, Hawhee also highlights the integral role of the musical arts to rhetorical and athletic training. Throughout the book, Hawhee weaves together close readings of multiple texts (poetry, oratory, sculpture, painting, architecture) in order to illuminate the intricate "network of overlapping practices" that connect the bodies of rhetoric, athletes, and musicians in Ancient Greece. To this reader, the central strengths of the study are methodological as well as conceptual. In terms of method, Hawhee carefully and with studied finesse integrates close readings of visual, spatial, and verbal texts and practices. In the wrong hands, this type of endeavor can easily appear as the worst kind of pastiche. Not so in this case where Hawhee manages the textual interpretation with deft expertise. Conceptually, the central premise that rhetoric was a practice that was fully embodied and, most importantly, that embodiment was not in a hierarchical relation to reason,

Journal

Philosophy and RhetoricPenn State University Press

Published: May 15, 2009

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