Bodies of Work: Civic Display and Labor in Industrial Pittsburgh (review)

Bodies of Work: Civic Display and Labor in Industrial Pittsburgh (review) pennsylvania history Kenny's vivid narrative remains a wonderful entrance into the complex world of eighteenth-century Pennsylvania, and allows readers to grapple with larger questions regarding historical causation, cultural encounters, and human nature. Kenny rightly places emphasis on the Paxton Boys' culpability in the final end of William Penn's dream. But the author's parallel portrait of expansion-minded and dishonest proprietary officials raises the question of whether the Holy Experiment was a hollow dream after Penn's death in 1718. We might profitably remember C.A. Weslager's argument that the turning point in Peaceable Kingdom's demise was not solely the Paxton Massacre, but the proprietary alliance with the Six Nations that enabled thousands of Scots-Irish and other European immigrants to flood onto the Delawares' lands. DAVID L. PRESTON The Citadel Edward Slavishak. Bodies of Work: Civic Display and Labor in Industrial Pittsburgh. (Duke University Press, 2008. Pp. 354, illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Cloth $89.95; Paper, $24.95.) From the nineteenth century and into the twentieth, the factories, mills, and mines of the Pittsburgh region were hazardous and often deadly. Falling debris and rock, overhead spills of molten metals, and explosions in steel mills and coal mines, for example, claimed the lives and devastated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies Penn State University Press

Bodies of Work: Civic Display and Labor in Industrial Pittsburgh (review)

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
2153-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

pennsylvania history Kenny's vivid narrative remains a wonderful entrance into the complex world of eighteenth-century Pennsylvania, and allows readers to grapple with larger questions regarding historical causation, cultural encounters, and human nature. Kenny rightly places emphasis on the Paxton Boys' culpability in the final end of William Penn's dream. But the author's parallel portrait of expansion-minded and dishonest proprietary officials raises the question of whether the Holy Experiment was a hollow dream after Penn's death in 1718. We might profitably remember C.A. Weslager's argument that the turning point in Peaceable Kingdom's demise was not solely the Paxton Massacre, but the proprietary alliance with the Six Nations that enabled thousands of Scots-Irish and other European immigrants to flood onto the Delawares' lands. DAVID L. PRESTON The Citadel Edward Slavishak. Bodies of Work: Civic Display and Labor in Industrial Pittsburgh. (Duke University Press, 2008. Pp. 354, illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Cloth $89.95; Paper, $24.95.) From the nineteenth century and into the twentieth, the factories, mills, and mines of the Pittsburgh region were hazardous and often deadly. Falling debris and rock, overhead spills of molten metals, and explosions in steel mills and coal mines, for example, claimed the lives and devastated

Journal

Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jul 16, 2010

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