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Beyond Selflessness in Ethics and Inquiry

Beyond Selflessness in Ethics and Inquiry Beyond Self lessness in Ethics and Inquiry he number of books devoted to philosophical commentary on Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals seems more or less to have doubled in the space of a year, and it is gratifying to find that this book, long regarded by philosophers in the English-speaking world as the work of Nietzsche's to be read and taught, is now receiving attention that does justice to this status. There is great reward in tracing the detailed reflections of different commentators on passages one thought one had read very carefully, finding agreements and disagreements but always new angles and nuances. It is impossible here to reflect even a fraction of my responses to the other authors included in this issue; my main aim has been to set out in outline my approach to reading GM and to comment on one or two issues of contention.1 I. One feature of my book on GM that is perhaps worth some comment is the historical background that I place Nietzsche against.2 It is noteworthy, I think, that in GM P, Nietzsche mentions just two thinkers as his antagonists: Schopenhauer and Rée. My aim was to take these thinkers, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Beyond Selflessness in Ethics and Inquiry

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Nov 28, 2008

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
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Abstract

Beyond Self lessness in Ethics and Inquiry he number of books devoted to philosophical commentary on Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals seems more or less to have doubled in the space of a year, and it is gratifying to find that this book, long regarded by philosophers in the English-speaking world as the work of Nietzsche's to be read and taught, is now receiving attention that does justice to this status. There is great reward in tracing the detailed reflections of different commentators on passages one thought one had read very carefully, finding agreements and disagreements but always new angles and nuances. It is impossible here to reflect even a fraction of my responses to the other authors included in this issue; my main aim has been to set out in outline my approach to reading GM and to comment on one or two issues of contention.1 I. One feature of my book on GM that is perhaps worth some comment is the historical background that I place Nietzsche against.2 It is noteworthy, I think, that in GM P, Nietzsche mentions just two thinkers as his antagonists: Schopenhauer and Rée. My aim was to take these thinkers,

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 28, 2008

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