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Benjamin Franklin: Philosopher of Progress

Benjamin Franklin: Philosopher of Progress Jerry Weinberger Benjamin Franklin was by the age of forty-two, when he goal of Enlightenment progressives (including the recent chorus retired, a very rich man. He made money in lots of different ways, of militant atheists)--a fully secular society governed by the but much of it was as a writer and publisher. By his own telling dictates of reason alone. he sold two hundred and fifty thousand copies of Poor Richard's Don't get me wrong. Franklin had a lot of nasty and Almanac in the years between 1733 and 1758 when the last ediEnlightenment-sounding things to say about the dangerous tion came out.1 That's a best seller even by today's publishing influence of priests and organized ecclesiastical power. In the mid-1730's he weighed into the religious politics in Philadelphia, standards and it is simply astounding if we consider the reading in support of the good-works preacher Samuel Hemphill in population in the Colonial America of Franklin's time. But it's his contest with the Presbyterian Synod. To defend Hemphill not surprising that Franklin's biggest seller was Poor Richard, against the Synod's charges of heterodoxy, Franklin published which is still the most famous of Franklin's literary inventions. three pamphlets (Observations http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Benjamin Franklin: Philosopher of Progress

The Good Society , Volume 17 (1) – Sep 20, 2008

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

Jerry Weinberger Benjamin Franklin was by the age of forty-two, when he goal of Enlightenment progressives (including the recent chorus retired, a very rich man. He made money in lots of different ways, of militant atheists)--a fully secular society governed by the but much of it was as a writer and publisher. By his own telling dictates of reason alone. he sold two hundred and fifty thousand copies of Poor Richard's Don't get me wrong. Franklin had a lot of nasty and Almanac in the years between 1733 and 1758 when the last ediEnlightenment-sounding things to say about the dangerous tion came out.1 That's a best seller even by today's publishing influence of priests and organized ecclesiastical power. In the mid-1730's he weighed into the religious politics in Philadelphia, standards and it is simply astounding if we consider the reading in support of the good-works preacher Samuel Hemphill in population in the Colonial America of Franklin's time. But it's his contest with the Presbyterian Synod. To defend Hemphill not surprising that Franklin's biggest seller was Poor Richard, against the Synod's charges of heterodoxy, Franklin published which is still the most famous of Franklin's literary inventions. three pamphlets (Observations

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Sep 20, 2008

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