Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Being In-Between and Becoming Undone: Bardos, Heterotopias, and Nepantla

Being In-Between and Becoming Undone: Bardos, Heterotopias, and Nepantla <p>abstract:</p><p>In this article I examine views of groundlessness that appear in three very different philosophical traditions: bardo teachings in Tibetan Buddhism, Michel Foucault’s heterotopia, and Gloria Anzaldúa’s nepantla. While each of these concepts is formulated in response to specific psychological, philosophical, and political questions, I argue that they each describe—in intimate, first-personal terms—experiences of rupture or dissolution of one’s own selfhood and/or thought. Using this formulation of groundlessness as a lens for reading these three concepts alongside one another, I offer a descriptive analysis of each of them, drawing out the moral-psychological ramifications of the nonfoundationalist claim that there is no fundamental “ground” to subjectivity or thought. I argue that bardos, heterotopias, and nepantla each exemplify how the rupture of groundless experience can become a vehicle for moral-psychological transformation by serving as an opportunity to recognize the pliability and spaciousness of a dynamic and unfixed selfhood.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Speculative Philosophy Penn State University Press

Being In-Between and Becoming Undone: Bardos, Heterotopias, and Nepantla

The Journal of Speculative Philosophy , Volume 34 (2) – May 13, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/being-in-between-and-becoming-undone-bardos-heterotopias-and-nepantla-Yl8kiuVEML
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Pennsylvania State University
ISSN
1527-9383

Abstract

<p>abstract:</p><p>In this article I examine views of groundlessness that appear in three very different philosophical traditions: bardo teachings in Tibetan Buddhism, Michel Foucault’s heterotopia, and Gloria Anzaldúa’s nepantla. While each of these concepts is formulated in response to specific psychological, philosophical, and political questions, I argue that they each describe—in intimate, first-personal terms—experiences of rupture or dissolution of one’s own selfhood and/or thought. Using this formulation of groundlessness as a lens for reading these three concepts alongside one another, I offer a descriptive analysis of each of them, drawing out the moral-psychological ramifications of the nonfoundationalist claim that there is no fundamental “ground” to subjectivity or thought. I argue that bardos, heterotopias, and nepantla each exemplify how the rupture of groundless experience can become a vehicle for moral-psychological transformation by serving as an opportunity to recognize the pliability and spaciousness of a dynamic and unfixed selfhood.</p>

Journal

The Journal of Speculative PhilosophyPenn State University Press

Published: May 13, 2020

There are no references for this article.