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Becomings in J. M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians and José Saramago's Blindness

Becomings in J. M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians and José Saramago's Blindness becomings in j. m. coetzee's WAITING FOR THE BARBARIANS and josé saramago's BLINDNESS Hania A. M. Nashef A bestial life is turning me into a beast. Há muitas maneiras de tornar-se animal. [There are many ways of becoming an animal.] Introduction In the first epigraph, the magistrate from J. M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians is describing his condition following his arrest and fall from grace, and in the second, the blind doctor from José Saramago's novel Blindness is commenting on the state to which he has deteriorated. Coetzee's novel portrays an official's fall from power, while Saramago's illustrates how, once blind, the eye doctor cannot live up to his profession or status in society and slides along with the other blind inmates at the asylum into a form that is closer to an animal than a human being. Fall from power or a change in status paves the way to the process of "becoming-animal" in both novels. This term is employed by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari in their A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. The reader may wonder what the link between both epigraphs is and how they can be interpreted by the Deleuzian and Guattarian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Becomings in J. M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians and José Saramago's Blindness

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 47 (1) – Mar 31, 2010

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
1528-4212
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Abstract

becomings in j. m. coetzee's WAITING FOR THE BARBARIANS and josé saramago's BLINDNESS Hania A. M. Nashef A bestial life is turning me into a beast. Há muitas maneiras de tornar-se animal. [There are many ways of becoming an animal.] Introduction In the first epigraph, the magistrate from J. M. Coetzee's Waiting for the Barbarians is describing his condition following his arrest and fall from grace, and in the second, the blind doctor from José Saramago's novel Blindness is commenting on the state to which he has deteriorated. Coetzee's novel portrays an official's fall from power, while Saramago's illustrates how, once blind, the eye doctor cannot live up to his profession or status in society and slides along with the other blind inmates at the asylum into a form that is closer to an animal than a human being. Fall from power or a change in status paves the way to the process of "becoming-animal" in both novels. This term is employed by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari in their A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. The reader may wonder what the link between both epigraphs is and how they can be interpreted by the Deleuzian and Guattarian

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 31, 2010

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