American Democracy and Technology

American Democracy and Technology A PEGS Journal VOL. 19 NO. 1 THE GOOD SOCIETY Committee on the Political Economy of the Good Society "The art of governing well has to be learned." -- Walter Lippmann Ivan Kenneally The frequent appeals to science and the laws of nature, as well as the appropriation of scientific vernacular to describe the essential premises of the founding, are both powerful evidence that America was intended to be a kind of technocratic republic. Hamilton argues, somewhat hyperbolically, that the impulse actuating the construction of our republic is the desire to decisively replace "accident and force" with "reflection and choice" as the ground of proper self-governance. While the phrase "accident and force" is immediately evocative of tyranny it also seems aimed at the contingent character of rule by ancestral tradition-- one could say that tradition is a kind of tyranny of accidental circumstance. Even the frequent discussion in the Federalist Papers of the United States as an experiment in self-governance and the concomitant emphasis on the ameliorative powers of institutionalism borrow from the conceptual architecture of science just as the central notion of the separation of powers seems vaguely modeled on the notion of energy and force in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

American Democracy and Technology

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

A PEGS Journal VOL. 19 NO. 1 THE GOOD SOCIETY Committee on the Political Economy of the Good Society "The art of governing well has to be learned." -- Walter Lippmann Ivan Kenneally The frequent appeals to science and the laws of nature, as well as the appropriation of scientific vernacular to describe the essential premises of the founding, are both powerful evidence that America was intended to be a kind of technocratic republic. Hamilton argues, somewhat hyperbolically, that the impulse actuating the construction of our republic is the desire to decisively replace "accident and force" with "reflection and choice" as the ground of proper self-governance. While the phrase "accident and force" is immediately evocative of tyranny it also seems aimed at the contingent character of rule by ancestral tradition-- one could say that tradition is a kind of tyranny of accidental circumstance. Even the frequent discussion in the Federalist Papers of the United States as an experiment in self-governance and the concomitant emphasis on the ameliorative powers of institutionalism borrow from the conceptual architecture of science just as the central notion of the separation of powers seems vaguely modeled on the notion of energy and force in

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Jul 22, 2010

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