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Al-Kindi and Nietzsche on the Stoic Art of Banishing Sorrow

Al-Kindi and Nietzsche on the Stoic Art of Banishing Sorrow 060 groff (139-174) 10/27/04 12:50 PM Page 139 Al-Kindı m and Nietzsche on the Stoic Art of Banishing Sorrow Peter S. Groff The world is deep, deeper than the day knows. Deep is its sorrow; joy—deeper still than grief can be. Sorrow implores: Go! But all joy wants eternity—wants deep, deep eternity! —Nietzsche, Z III, “The Other Dancing Song” 3. Now just give me the worst throw of your dice, fate. Today I am turning every- thing into gold. —Nietzsche, KSA 10:5[1] #130 he “Philosopher of the Arabs” and the “good European”: two unlikely fig- Tures, perhaps, for a comparative engagement. What could serve as the basis of a dialogue between Abum Yumsuf Ya‘qumb ibn Is.haq al-Kindı m, the first major figure in the Islamicate philosophical tradition, and Friedrich Nietzsche, the figure in whom the Western philosophical tradition arguably culminates and overcomes itself? Al-Kindı m lived and wrote in ninth-century Baghdad, the heart of the cosmopolitan ‘Abbamsid caliphate. His home was a world shaped by Islam, whose newly emergent culture was still just beginning to feel and exercise its own profound creative-intellectual powers. By most accounts he was a pious man, but also a learned polymath, dedicated to demonstrating http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Al-Kindi and Nietzsche on the Stoic Art of Banishing Sorrow

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 28 (1) – Nov 29, 2004

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 The Friedrich Nietzsche Society.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

060 groff (139-174) 10/27/04 12:50 PM Page 139 Al-Kindı m and Nietzsche on the Stoic Art of Banishing Sorrow Peter S. Groff The world is deep, deeper than the day knows. Deep is its sorrow; joy—deeper still than grief can be. Sorrow implores: Go! But all joy wants eternity—wants deep, deep eternity! —Nietzsche, Z III, “The Other Dancing Song” 3. Now just give me the worst throw of your dice, fate. Today I am turning every- thing into gold. —Nietzsche, KSA 10:5[1] #130 he “Philosopher of the Arabs” and the “good European”: two unlikely fig- Tures, perhaps, for a comparative engagement. What could serve as the basis of a dialogue between Abum Yumsuf Ya‘qumb ibn Is.haq al-Kindı m, the first major figure in the Islamicate philosophical tradition, and Friedrich Nietzsche, the figure in whom the Western philosophical tradition arguably culminates and overcomes itself? Al-Kindı m lived and wrote in ninth-century Baghdad, the heart of the cosmopolitan ‘Abbamsid caliphate. His home was a world shaped by Islam, whose newly emergent culture was still just beginning to feel and exercise its own profound creative-intellectual powers. By most accounts he was a pious man, but also a learned polymath, dedicated to demonstrating

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 29, 2004

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