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Affectivity and Philosophy after Spinoza and Nietzsche: Making Knowledge the Most Powerful Affect by Stuart Pethick (review)

Affectivity and Philosophy after Spinoza and Nietzsche: Making Knowledge the Most Powerful Affect... Book Reviews Stuart Pethick, Affectivity and Philosophy after Spinoza and Nietzsche: Making Knowledge the Most Powerful Affect. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. 251 pp. isbn: 978-1-137-48605-9. Hardcover, £63. Reviewed by Keith Ansell-Pearson, University of Warwick In 1881 Nietzsche discovered that he had a precursor: Spinoza. In a letter to Franz Overbeck postmarked July 30—the eve of the experience of the eternal recurrence—he enumerated the points of doctrine that he believed he shared with Spinoza, including the denial of free will, a moral world order, and evil, and he also mentioned the task of “making knowledge the most powerful affect [die Erkenntniß zum mächtigsten Affekt zu machen]” (KSB 6:111). A note of the same year reads, “Spinoza: We are only deter- mined in our actions by desires and ae ff cts. Knowledge must be an ae ff ct in order to be a motive. I say: it must be a passion to be a motive” (KSA 9:11[193]). Nietzsche’s first published reference to the “passion of knowledge [Leidenschaft der Erkenntnis]” is also from this year: he remarks in D 429 that the drive to knowledge has become so strongly rooted in us that we could not now sacrifice knowledge for happiness. Indeed, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Affectivity and Philosophy after Spinoza and Nietzsche: Making Knowledge the Most Powerful Affect by Stuart Pethick (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 48 (3) – Nov 22, 2017

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

Book Reviews Stuart Pethick, Affectivity and Philosophy after Spinoza and Nietzsche: Making Knowledge the Most Powerful Affect. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. 251 pp. isbn: 978-1-137-48605-9. Hardcover, £63. Reviewed by Keith Ansell-Pearson, University of Warwick In 1881 Nietzsche discovered that he had a precursor: Spinoza. In a letter to Franz Overbeck postmarked July 30—the eve of the experience of the eternal recurrence—he enumerated the points of doctrine that he believed he shared with Spinoza, including the denial of free will, a moral world order, and evil, and he also mentioned the task of “making knowledge the most powerful affect [die Erkenntniß zum mächtigsten Affekt zu machen]” (KSB 6:111). A note of the same year reads, “Spinoza: We are only deter- mined in our actions by desires and ae ff cts. Knowledge must be an ae ff ct in order to be a motive. I say: it must be a passion to be a motive” (KSA 9:11[193]). Nietzsche’s first published reference to the “passion of knowledge [Leidenschaft der Erkenntnis]” is also from this year: he remarks in D 429 that the drive to knowledge has become so strongly rooted in us that we could not now sacrifice knowledge for happiness. Indeed,

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 22, 2017

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