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Acts of Enjoyment: Rhetoric, Žižek, and the Return of the Subject (review)

Acts of Enjoyment: Rhetoric, Žižek, and the Return of the Subject (review) : Rhetoric, Zizek, and the Return of the Subject by Thomas Rickert Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2007. Pp. x + 252. $24.95, hardcover. Thomas Rickert had a falling-out with his brother, and this distresses him so much that his disrupted relation is described as "traumatic." Rickert reports that while listening to a portable CD player during a run on an unexpectedly warm winter day, a song by the now defunct jazz/rock band Morphine reminded him of a happy time at a pool hall with his brother (24). Mediated--or better, medicated--by music, the homological happiness of running in the sun and a positive past memory also resurfaced a painful relational rupture, the reason of which Rickert omits to underscore that mysterious, "little detail or object" of the Real that marks his singular finitude as a writing subject (216 n. 11). We'll want to come back to this curiously deliberate omission, but for the present we note Rickert is not simply an undead author but a human being with relations and feelings. He is not just a gifted scholar or a bundle of reflections, but a nexus of body and movement and words and affect. If there is anything http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy and Rhetoric Penn State University Press

Acts of Enjoyment: Rhetoric, Žižek, and the Return of the Subject (review)

Philosophy and Rhetoric , Volume 42 (2) – May 15, 2009

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Penn State University Press
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Copyright © Penn State University Press
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1527-2079
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Abstract

: Rhetoric, Zizek, and the Return of the Subject by Thomas Rickert Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2007. Pp. x + 252. $24.95, hardcover. Thomas Rickert had a falling-out with his brother, and this distresses him so much that his disrupted relation is described as "traumatic." Rickert reports that while listening to a portable CD player during a run on an unexpectedly warm winter day, a song by the now defunct jazz/rock band Morphine reminded him of a happy time at a pool hall with his brother (24). Mediated--or better, medicated--by music, the homological happiness of running in the sun and a positive past memory also resurfaced a painful relational rupture, the reason of which Rickert omits to underscore that mysterious, "little detail or object" of the Real that marks his singular finitude as a writing subject (216 n. 11). We'll want to come back to this curiously deliberate omission, but for the present we note Rickert is not simply an undead author but a human being with relations and feelings. He is not just a gifted scholar or a bundle of reflections, but a nexus of body and movement and words and affect. If there is anything

Journal

Philosophy and RhetoricPenn State University Press

Published: May 15, 2009

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