A Country Storekeeper in Pennsylvania: Creating Economic Networks in Early America, 1790-1807 (review)

A Country Storekeeper in Pennsylvania: Creating Economic Networks in Early America, 1790-1807... pennsylvania history While the account is a thorough one reflecting many years of research, it does not venture a guess on the total number of Scotch-Irish emigrants to the colonies, since the records of the emigration are so fragmentary. There is a short explanation of the process of flax cultivation and linen production that may require further development for American readers unfamiliar with how linen was made. The total amount of goods involved in the trade is also not in the book, but again the records are inadequate for a proper estimate. MacMaster prefers to use the term "Scotch-Irish" to refer to the Ulster people in the story he tells, and he has found several new references to them from the time using this expression, including one from Edmund Burke, who never visited the colonies. Some of the sources mentioned in the book also used the term "Irish" to refer to these people in the eighteenth century, so exactly what to label what Patrick Griffin calls "the people with no name" is not definitively settled. This reviewer wishes that the author had written more about what he calls the Ulster merchants' "consciousness and culture," much as Timothy Breen http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies Penn State University Press

A Country Storekeeper in Pennsylvania: Creating Economic Networks in Early America, 1790-1807 (review)

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
2153-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

pennsylvania history While the account is a thorough one reflecting many years of research, it does not venture a guess on the total number of Scotch-Irish emigrants to the colonies, since the records of the emigration are so fragmentary. There is a short explanation of the process of flax cultivation and linen production that may require further development for American readers unfamiliar with how linen was made. The total amount of goods involved in the trade is also not in the book, but again the records are inadequate for a proper estimate. MacMaster prefers to use the term "Scotch-Irish" to refer to the Ulster people in the story he tells, and he has found several new references to them from the time using this expression, including one from Edmund Burke, who never visited the colonies. Some of the sources mentioned in the book also used the term "Irish" to refer to these people in the eighteenth century, so exactly what to label what Patrick Griffin calls "the people with no name" is not definitively settled. This reviewer wishes that the author had written more about what he calls the Ulster merchants' "consciousness and culture," much as Timothy Breen

Journal

Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 3, 2010

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