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Working-time reduction and employment: experiences in Europe and economic policy recommendations

Working-time reduction and employment: experiences in Europe and economic policy recommendations The paper seeks to evaluate the evidence on the employment effects of the collective working-time reductions in Europe over the past 20 years. While theoretical analyses produce contradictory assessments, most empirical studies show positive employment effects but take insufficient account of these conditions under which the reductions in working time were implemented. These conditions for the success of collective working-time reductions include an active training policy designed to minimise skill shortages in the labour market, the modernisation of work organisation, wage increases in conjunction with productivity gains and a more equal income distribution. Key words http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cambridge Journal of Economics Oxford University Press

Working-time reduction and employment: experiences in Europe and economic policy recommendations

Cambridge Journal of Economics , Volume 25 (2) – Mar 1, 2001

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References (20)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Cambridge Political Economy Society
ISSN
0309-166X
eISSN
1464-3545
DOI
10.1093/cje/25.2.209
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The paper seeks to evaluate the evidence on the employment effects of the collective working-time reductions in Europe over the past 20 years. While theoretical analyses produce contradictory assessments, most empirical studies show positive employment effects but take insufficient account of these conditions under which the reductions in working time were implemented. These conditions for the success of collective working-time reductions include an active training policy designed to minimise skill shortages in the labour market, the modernisation of work organisation, wage increases in conjunction with productivity gains and a more equal income distribution. Key words

Journal

Cambridge Journal of EconomicsOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2001

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