Utility evaluation of academic research: six basic propositions

Utility evaluation of academic research: six basic propositions A review of the literature and three case studies in housing research resulted in a framework of six propositions as to how to assess academic research utility. First, it can be measured directly and indirectly. Secondly, utility is dependent not only on academic research supply of knowledge and technology, but equally importantly on demand from industry and the public sector. Thirdly, research utility should be viewed in short- and long-term perspectives, which makes assessment dependent on time intervals. Fourthly, the framework for evaluating research utility must take into consideration a number of differences with respect to academic research (between applied and basic research, between research areas, between disciplines within an area). Fifthly, a framework must consider the differences in user groups. Finally, the transmission of knowledge from the academic setting to industry and the public sector is predominantly an interactive process carried out by individuals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research Evaluation Oxford University Press

Utility evaluation of academic research: six basic propositions

Research Evaluation, Volume 7 (3) – Dec 1, 1998

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
Subject
Main article
ISSN
0958-2029
eISSN
1471-5449
DOI
10.1093/rev/7.3.159
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A review of the literature and three case studies in housing research resulted in a framework of six propositions as to how to assess academic research utility. First, it can be measured directly and indirectly. Secondly, utility is dependent not only on academic research supply of knowledge and technology, but equally importantly on demand from industry and the public sector. Thirdly, research utility should be viewed in short- and long-term perspectives, which makes assessment dependent on time intervals. Fourthly, the framework for evaluating research utility must take into consideration a number of differences with respect to academic research (between applied and basic research, between research areas, between disciplines within an area). Fifthly, a framework must consider the differences in user groups. Finally, the transmission of knowledge from the academic setting to industry and the public sector is predominantly an interactive process carried out by individuals.

Journal

Research EvaluationOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1998

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