Understanding Processes and Downstream Linkages of Headwater Systems

Understanding Processes and Downstream Linkages of Headwater Systems Articles Understanding Processes and Downstream Linkages of Headwater Systems TAKASHI GOMI, ROY C. SIDLE, AND JOHN S. RICHARDSON eadwater systems, the areas from which water Horiginates within a channel network, are characterized HEADWATERS DIFFER FROM DOWN- by interactions among hydrologic, geomorphic, and biolog- ical processes that vary from hillslopes to stream channels and STREAM REACHES BY THEIR CLOSE from terrestrial to aquatic environments (Hack and Goodlett COUPLING TO HILLSLOPE PROCESSES, 1960). Although hydrologic, geomorphic, and biological processes in headwater systems have been studied for the MORE TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL VARIATION, last 50 years and much knowledge related to these systems is available (Hack and Goodlett 1960, Hewlett and Hibbert AND THEIR NEED FOR DIFFERENT MEANS 1967, Likens et al. 1977), the roles of headwater streams within the watershed and the linkages from headwater to OF PROTECTION FROM LAND USE downstream systems are poorly understood. Headwater sys- tems are critical areas for nutrient dynamics and habitat for macroinvertebrates, fish, and amphibians within watersheds larger watersheds need to be recognized in both conceptual (Meyer and Wallace 2001). Because of their geographical and field studies. Therefore, our objectives for this article are isolation, headwater systems also support genetically isolated to review characteristics http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

Understanding Processes and Downstream Linkages of Headwater Systems

BioScience, Volume 52 (10) – Oct 1, 2002

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2002 American Institute of Biological Sciences
Subject
Overview Articles
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
D.O.I.
10.1641/0006-3568(2002)052[0905:UPADLO]2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Articles Understanding Processes and Downstream Linkages of Headwater Systems TAKASHI GOMI, ROY C. SIDLE, AND JOHN S. RICHARDSON eadwater systems, the areas from which water Horiginates within a channel network, are characterized HEADWATERS DIFFER FROM DOWN- by interactions among hydrologic, geomorphic, and biolog- ical processes that vary from hillslopes to stream channels and STREAM REACHES BY THEIR CLOSE from terrestrial to aquatic environments (Hack and Goodlett COUPLING TO HILLSLOPE PROCESSES, 1960). Although hydrologic, geomorphic, and biological processes in headwater systems have been studied for the MORE TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL VARIATION, last 50 years and much knowledge related to these systems is available (Hack and Goodlett 1960, Hewlett and Hibbert AND THEIR NEED FOR DIFFERENT MEANS 1967, Likens et al. 1977), the roles of headwater streams within the watershed and the linkages from headwater to OF PROTECTION FROM LAND USE downstream systems are poorly understood. Headwater sys- tems are critical areas for nutrient dynamics and habitat for macroinvertebrates, fish, and amphibians within watersheds larger watersheds need to be recognized in both conceptual (Meyer and Wallace 2001). Because of their geographical and field studies. Therefore, our objectives for this article are isolation, headwater systems also support genetically isolated to review characteristics

Journal

BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2002

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