Treatment issues in childhood obesity

Treatment issues in childhood obesity Treatment issues in childhood obesity deepdyve.host = 'www.deepdyve.com'; // replace with an affiliateId that we provide deepdyve.affiliateId = "highwire-oupjournals"; // the div to fill in with the rental link deepdyve.divIdList = ('rentalLink', 'rentalLink2'); // this is the anchor text for the rental link deepdyve.rentText = "Rent Article at DeepDyve"; deepdyve.divIdMap = {'rentalLink':'Rent Article at DeepDyve','rentalLink2':'Learn more here.'}; // document identifier and identifier type deepdyve.fieldName = 'journal_doi'; deepdyve.docId = "10.1093/fampra/19.3.304"; var callbackToken='5054EAF0D8829C0'; var subCode='oupjournal_sub'; var gAuthTimeStamp = '2015-11-01T21:27:24.014-08:00'; var gSessionId = 'UluFknBHXJ-W3FIZ-hOP9Q'; var gAuthzRequired = 'false'; var gAuthnMethods1 = 'ip'; var gAuthnMethods2 = 'ip'; var gAuthnIPs = '64.13.143.102'; var gAuthnIndividuals = ''; var gAuthnInstitutions = '151647456'; MathJax.Hub.Config({ tex2jax: { inlineMath: (("$","$"),("\\(","\\)")), processClass: "tex2jax_process|mathjax" } }); MathJax.Hub.Queue(function() { gColTempResize = true; fixColHeights(1); gColTempResize = false; }); var siqDOI = encodeURIComponent("10.1093/fampra/19.3.304"); var siqIsOpenAccess = encodeURIComponent(""); var siqPubDate = encodeURIComponent("20020601"); if (siqDOI.length == 0) { siqDOI = "UNKNOWN"; } if (gAuthnIndividuals.length != 0) { if (gAuthnInstitutions.length != 0) { authnEntity = encodeURIComponent(gAuthnIndividuals + ',' + gAuthnInstitutions); } else { authnEntity = encodeURIComponent(gAuthnIndividuals); } } else { authnEntity = encodeURIComponent(gAuthnInstitutions); } var commonString = 'authSessionId=' + gSessionId + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'authzRequired=' + gAuthzRequired + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'authentication_method=' + encodeURIComponent(gAuthnMethods2) + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'authnIPs=' + gAuthnIPs + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'authnInstitutions=' + authnEntity; var gPageId = "pageid-content"; var gVariant = "extract"; // Not completely done var eventType = "extract"; var accessType; if (siqIsOpenAccess == 'true') { accessType = 'SOA'; } else { accessType = 'subscription'; } var NTPT_PGEXTRA = commonString + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'event_type=' + eventType + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'publication_date=' + siqPubDate + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'access_type=' + accessType + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'doi=' + siqDOI ; // alert("NTPT_PGEXTRA is " + NTPT_PGEXTRA); We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Skip Navigation Oxford Journals Contact Us My Basket My Account Family Practice About This Journal Contact This Journal Subscriptions View Current Issue (Volume 32 Issue 5 October 2015) Archive Search Institution: :: Sign In as Personal Subscriber Oxford Journals Medicine & Health Family Practice Volume 19 Issue 3 Pp. 304-309. Treatment issues in childhood obesity Josephine Connolly , Lauren Gargiula and Diane Reeve Department of Family Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8461, USA. Connolly J, Gargiula L and Reeve D. Treatment issues in childhood obesity. Family Practice 2002; 19: 304–309 Introduction Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions in the USA and is a growing problem in developed countries. It is associated with a number of co-morbidities, such as coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, gall bladder disease and sleep apnoea. The health care cost associated with obesity in US adults is estimated to be 100 billion dollars annually. 1 Trends in childhood obesity are paralleling those of adult obesity, with ~25% of American children either overweight or obese. 2 Childhood obesity is associated with increased risk factors, such as high cholesterol and hypertension, for chronic illness in adulthood, and with increased presentation of co-morbidities, such as type 2 diabetes, in early adolescence. 3, , 4 These trends in childhood obesity are global, with increasing prevalence in Russia, China and Brazil, as well as the USA. Wang suggests that this trend will lead to a rise in global rates of obesity-related diseases. 1 Data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys reveal that the prevalence of adult and childhood obesity increased substantially over a single decade. This increase cannot, therefore, be attributed to changes in the genetic makeup of the population. The rapid rate of increase in the prevalence of obesity must be due to the interaction between genetic predispositions and changes in the environment, such as decreased opportunities for physical activity and increased availability of calorically dense foods. 5 Such trends speak to the need for family-based behavioural weight management programmes, since families share genetic predispositions, as well as environments. This article reviews the current literature, specifically examining family-based treatment programmes, types of dietary interventions and macronutrient issues. Epstein laid the groundwork for family-based behavioural treatments with his landmark 1990 publication in which … (Full Text of this Article) « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Family Practice (2002) 19 (3): 304-309. doi: 10.1093/fampra/19.3.304 » Extract Free Full Text (HTML) Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Selections from Current Literature Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Connolly, J. Articles by Reeve, D. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Connolly, J. Articles by Gargiula, L. Articles by Reeve, D. Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue October 2015 32 (5) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Rights & Permissions Dispatch date of the next issue This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) We are mobile – find out more Journals Career Network Impact factor: 1.861 5-Yr impact factor: 1.998 Useful Links Useful Links Editor Professor Victoria Neale View full editorial board For Authors Instructions to authors Online submission Submit a manuscript Self Archiving Public Access Policy Open access options for authors - visit Oxford Open This journal enables compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements var taxonomies = ("MED00780"); Most Most Read Potential barriers to the use of health services among ethnic minorities: a review First steps in qualitative data analysis: transcribing Rural health around the world: challenges and solutions Ethics of qualitative research: are there special issues for health services research? Sampling for qualitative research » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Sampling for qualitative research A comparison of a Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI) against two established satisfaction scales as an outcome measure of primary care consultations Using the Internet to conduct surveys of health professionals: a valid alternative? Patients' priorities with respect to general practice care: an international comparison The frequency and nature of medical error in primary care: understanding the diversity across studies » View all Most Cited articles Online ISSN 1460-2229 - Print ISSN 0263-2136 Copyright © 2015 Oxford University Press Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? 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Oxford University Press
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Copyright © 2015 Oxford University Press
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0263-2136
eISSN
1460-2229
DOI
10.1093/fampra/19.3.304
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Abstract

Treatment issues in childhood obesity deepdyve.host = 'www.deepdyve.com'; // replace with an affiliateId that we provide deepdyve.affiliateId = "highwire-oupjournals"; // the div to fill in with the rental link deepdyve.divIdList = ('rentalLink', 'rentalLink2'); // this is the anchor text for the rental link deepdyve.rentText = "Rent Article at DeepDyve"; deepdyve.divIdMap = {'rentalLink':'Rent Article at DeepDyve','rentalLink2':'Learn more here.'}; // document identifier and identifier type deepdyve.fieldName = 'journal_doi'; deepdyve.docId = "10.1093/fampra/19.3.304"; var callbackToken='5054EAF0D8829C0'; var subCode='oupjournal_sub'; var gAuthTimeStamp = '2015-11-01T21:27:24.014-08:00'; var gSessionId = 'UluFknBHXJ-W3FIZ-hOP9Q'; var gAuthzRequired = 'false'; var gAuthnMethods1 = 'ip'; var gAuthnMethods2 = 'ip'; var gAuthnIPs = '64.13.143.102'; var gAuthnIndividuals = ''; var gAuthnInstitutions = '151647456'; MathJax.Hub.Config({ tex2jax: { inlineMath: (("$","$"),("\\(","\\)")), processClass: "tex2jax_process|mathjax" } }); MathJax.Hub.Queue(function() { gColTempResize = true; fixColHeights(1); gColTempResize = false; }); var siqDOI = encodeURIComponent("10.1093/fampra/19.3.304"); var siqIsOpenAccess = encodeURIComponent(""); var siqPubDate = encodeURIComponent("20020601"); if (siqDOI.length == 0) { siqDOI = "UNKNOWN"; } if (gAuthnIndividuals.length != 0) { if (gAuthnInstitutions.length != 0) { authnEntity = encodeURIComponent(gAuthnIndividuals + ',' + gAuthnInstitutions); } else { authnEntity = encodeURIComponent(gAuthnIndividuals); } } else { authnEntity = encodeURIComponent(gAuthnInstitutions); } var commonString = 'authSessionId=' + gSessionId + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'authzRequired=' + gAuthzRequired + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'authentication_method=' + encodeURIComponent(gAuthnMethods2) + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'authnIPs=' + gAuthnIPs + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'authnInstitutions=' + authnEntity; var gPageId = "pageid-content"; var gVariant = "extract"; // Not completely done var eventType = "extract"; var accessType; if (siqIsOpenAccess == 'true') { accessType = 'SOA'; } else { accessType = 'subscription'; } var NTPT_PGEXTRA = commonString + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'event_type=' + eventType + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'publication_date=' + siqPubDate + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'access_type=' + accessType + String.fromCharCode(0x26) + 'doi=' + siqDOI ; // alert("NTPT_PGEXTRA is " + NTPT_PGEXTRA); We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Skip Navigation Oxford Journals Contact Us My Basket My Account Family Practice About This Journal Contact This Journal Subscriptions View Current Issue (Volume 32 Issue 5 October 2015) Archive Search Institution: :: Sign In as Personal Subscriber Oxford Journals Medicine & Health Family Practice Volume 19 Issue 3 Pp. 304-309. Treatment issues in childhood obesity Josephine Connolly , Lauren Gargiula and Diane Reeve Department of Family Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8461, USA. Connolly J, Gargiula L and Reeve D. Treatment issues in childhood obesity. Family Practice 2002; 19: 304–309 Introduction Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions in the USA and is a growing problem in developed countries. It is associated with a number of co-morbidities, such as coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, gall bladder disease and sleep apnoea. The health care cost associated with obesity in US adults is estimated to be 100 billion dollars annually. 1 Trends in childhood obesity are paralleling those of adult obesity, with ~25% of American children either overweight or obese. 2 Childhood obesity is associated with increased risk factors, such as high cholesterol and hypertension, for chronic illness in adulthood, and with increased presentation of co-morbidities, such as type 2 diabetes, in early adolescence. 3, , 4 These trends in childhood obesity are global, with increasing prevalence in Russia, China and Brazil, as well as the USA. Wang suggests that this trend will lead to a rise in global rates of obesity-related diseases. 1 Data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys reveal that the prevalence of adult and childhood obesity increased substantially over a single decade. This increase cannot, therefore, be attributed to changes in the genetic makeup of the population. The rapid rate of increase in the prevalence of obesity must be due to the interaction between genetic predispositions and changes in the environment, such as decreased opportunities for physical activity and increased availability of calorically dense foods. 5 Such trends speak to the need for family-based behavioural weight management programmes, since families share genetic predispositions, as well as environments. This article reviews the current literature, specifically examining family-based treatment programmes, types of dietary interventions and macronutrient issues. Epstein laid the groundwork for family-based behavioural treatments with his landmark 1990 publication in which … (Full Text of this Article) « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Family Practice (2002) 19 (3): 304-309. doi: 10.1093/fampra/19.3.304 » Extract Free Full Text (HTML) Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Selections from Current Literature Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Connolly, J. Articles by Reeve, D. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Connolly, J. Articles by Gargiula, L. Articles by Reeve, D. Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue October 2015 32 (5) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Rights & Permissions Dispatch date of the next issue This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) We are mobile – find out more Journals Career Network Impact factor: 1.861 5-Yr impact factor: 1.998 Useful Links Useful Links Editor Professor Victoria Neale View full editorial board For Authors Instructions to authors Online submission Submit a manuscript Self Archiving Public Access Policy Open access options for authors - visit Oxford Open This journal enables compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements var taxonomies = ("MED00780"); Most Most Read Potential barriers to the use of health services among ethnic minorities: a review First steps in qualitative data analysis: transcribing Rural health around the world: challenges and solutions Ethics of qualitative research: are there special issues for health services research? Sampling for qualitative research » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Sampling for qualitative research A comparison of a Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI) against two established satisfaction scales as an outcome measure of primary care consultations Using the Internet to conduct surveys of health professionals: a valid alternative? Patients' priorities with respect to general practice care: an international comparison The frequency and nature of medical error in primary care: understanding the diversity across studies » View all Most Cited articles Online ISSN 1460-2229 - Print ISSN 0263-2136 Copyright © 2015 Oxford University Press Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-189672-16"); pageTracker._setDomainName(".oxfordjournals.org"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {}

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Family PracticeOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2002

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