Transpiration and canopy conductance in a eucalypt plantation using shallow saline groundwater

Transpiration and canopy conductance in a eucalypt plantation using shallow saline groundwater Tree water use and canopy conductance were monitored in a 20-year-old Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden and Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. plantation shown to be using shallow saline groundwater. Annual water use, obtained from two years of heat pulse measurements of daily water use, was approximately 300 mm for both species with a winter minimum and a weak maximum in spring. Canopy conductance obtained from the ratio of daily water use to daily mean vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was low during summer, but rose to high values in winter. Diurnal variation in stomatal conductance was recorded in late summer and spring. Stomatal conductance increased with radiation but showed no evidence of a relationship with VPD. Canopy conductance was generally less than half the observed stomatal conductance on a leaf area basis, and usually declined steadily through the day, showing a strong inverse relationship with VPD. For both species, a decoupling coefficient (Ω) of 0.1 to 0.3 was obtained from canopy conductance and climate observations, and a higher value of Ω was derived from canopy and stomatal conductances. The difference in Ω values is interpreted as demonstrating the inclusion of a soil to leaf conductance within the canopy conductance estimates. Soil to leaf conductance is smaller than both stomatal and aerodynamic conductances, and effectively limits water use by the plantation. The observed variation in soil to leaf conductance is consistent with resistance to water movement to the roots increasing as the soil in the vicinity of the active roots dries as a result of water uptake during the day. Plantations may be useful for transpiring shallow ground-water to control rising water tables and salinity, but their effectiveness as water users will be reduced as the water table is drawn down in soils of low hydraulic conductivity. Plantations irrigated with pumped groundwater or drainage water may provide a more efficient disposal system where these water sources are available. Key words decoupling coefficient Eucalyptus camaldulensis Eucalyptus grandis heat pulse method leaf water potential stomatal conductance © 1998 Heron Publishing—Victoria Canada « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Tree Physiol (1998) 18 (8-9): 547-555. doi: 10.1093/treephys/18.8-9.547 » Abstract Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Original Article Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Morris, J. Articles by Collopy, J. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Morris, J. Articles by Mann, L. Articles by Collopy, J. Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue November 2015 35 (11) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Rights & permissions We are mobile – find out more This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) Journals Career Network Impact factor: 3.655 5-Yr impact factor: 3.787 Ram Oren, Editor-in-Chief Torgny Näsholm, Associate Editor-In-Chief Sari Palmroth, Managing Editor View the full editorial board For Authors Instructions to authors Services for authors Online submission instructions Submit Now! Author Self Archiving Policy Open access options available for authors - visit Oxford Open Corporate Services What we offer Advertising sales Reprints Supplements Alerting Services Email table of contents XML RSS feed var taxonomies = ("SCI01210"); Most Most Read Nutrition of mangroves Relationships of tree height and diameter at breast height revisited: analyses of stem growth using 20-year data of an even-aged Chamaecyparis obtusa stand A method for routine measurements of total sugar and starch content in woody plant tissues Non-structural carbohydrates in woody plants compared among laboratories Size, shape and surface morphology of starch granules from Norway spruce needles revealed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy: effects of elevated CO2 concentration » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Scaling of angiosperm xylem structure with safety and efficiency Evaluation of transpiration in a Douglas-fir stand by means of sap flow measurements A mathematical and statistical analysis of the curves illustrating vulnerability of xylem to cavitation Carbon dynamics in trees: feast or famine? Nighttime transpiration in woody plants from contrasting ecosystems » View all Most Cited articles Disclaimer: Please note that abstracts for content published before 1996 were created through digital scanning and may therefore not exactly replicate the text of the original print issues. All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, but the Publisher will not be held responsible for any remaining inaccuracies. If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department. Online ISSN 1758-4469 - Print ISSN 0829-318X Copyright © 2015 Oxford University Press Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-189672-16"); pageTracker._setDomainName(".oxfordjournals.org"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {} http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tree Physiology Oxford University Press

Transpiration and canopy conductance in a eucalypt plantation using shallow saline groundwater

Tree Physiology, Volume 18 (8-9) – Aug 1, 1998

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/transpiration-and-canopy-conductance-in-a-eucalypt-plantation-using-uUTL80dduL
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Oxford University Press
ISSN
0829-318X
eISSN
1758-4469
D.O.I.
10.1093/treephys/18.8-9.547
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Tree water use and canopy conductance were monitored in a 20-year-old Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden and Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. plantation shown to be using shallow saline groundwater. Annual water use, obtained from two years of heat pulse measurements of daily water use, was approximately 300 mm for both species with a winter minimum and a weak maximum in spring. Canopy conductance obtained from the ratio of daily water use to daily mean vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was low during summer, but rose to high values in winter. Diurnal variation in stomatal conductance was recorded in late summer and spring. Stomatal conductance increased with radiation but showed no evidence of a relationship with VPD. Canopy conductance was generally less than half the observed stomatal conductance on a leaf area basis, and usually declined steadily through the day, showing a strong inverse relationship with VPD. For both species, a decoupling coefficient (Ω) of 0.1 to 0.3 was obtained from canopy conductance and climate observations, and a higher value of Ω was derived from canopy and stomatal conductances. The difference in Ω values is interpreted as demonstrating the inclusion of a soil to leaf conductance within the canopy conductance estimates. Soil to leaf conductance is smaller than both stomatal and aerodynamic conductances, and effectively limits water use by the plantation. The observed variation in soil to leaf conductance is consistent with resistance to water movement to the roots increasing as the soil in the vicinity of the active roots dries as a result of water uptake during the day. Plantations may be useful for transpiring shallow ground-water to control rising water tables and salinity, but their effectiveness as water users will be reduced as the water table is drawn down in soils of low hydraulic conductivity. Plantations irrigated with pumped groundwater or drainage water may provide a more efficient disposal system where these water sources are available. Key words decoupling coefficient Eucalyptus camaldulensis Eucalyptus grandis heat pulse method leaf water potential stomatal conductance © 1998 Heron Publishing—Victoria Canada « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Tree Physiol (1998) 18 (8-9): 547-555. doi: 10.1093/treephys/18.8-9.547 » Abstract Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Original Article Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Morris, J. Articles by Collopy, J. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Morris, J. Articles by Mann, L. Articles by Collopy, J. Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue November 2015 35 (11) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Rights & permissions We are mobile – find out more This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) Journals Career Network Impact factor: 3.655 5-Yr impact factor: 3.787 Ram Oren, Editor-in-Chief Torgny Näsholm, Associate Editor-In-Chief Sari Palmroth, Managing Editor View the full editorial board For Authors Instructions to authors Services for authors Online submission instructions Submit Now! Author Self Archiving Policy Open access options available for authors - visit Oxford Open Corporate Services What we offer Advertising sales Reprints Supplements Alerting Services Email table of contents XML RSS feed var taxonomies = ("SCI01210"); Most Most Read Nutrition of mangroves Relationships of tree height and diameter at breast height revisited: analyses of stem growth using 20-year data of an even-aged Chamaecyparis obtusa stand A method for routine measurements of total sugar and starch content in woody plant tissues Non-structural carbohydrates in woody plants compared among laboratories Size, shape and surface morphology of starch granules from Norway spruce needles revealed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy: effects of elevated CO2 concentration » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Scaling of angiosperm xylem structure with safety and efficiency Evaluation of transpiration in a Douglas-fir stand by means of sap flow measurements A mathematical and statistical analysis of the curves illustrating vulnerability of xylem to cavitation Carbon dynamics in trees: feast or famine? Nighttime transpiration in woody plants from contrasting ecosystems » View all Most Cited articles Disclaimer: Please note that abstracts for content published before 1996 were created through digital scanning and may therefore not exactly replicate the text of the original print issues. All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, but the Publisher will not be held responsible for any remaining inaccuracies. If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department. Online ISSN 1758-4469 - Print ISSN 0829-318X Copyright © 2015 Oxford University Press Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-189672-16"); pageTracker._setDomainName(".oxfordjournals.org"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {}

Journal

Tree PhysiologyOxford University Press

Published: Aug 1, 1998

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off