Trading off health, environmental and genetic modification attributes in food

Trading off health, environmental and genetic modification attributes in food This study examines the trade-offs made by consumers between possible risks associated with genetically modified (GM) ingredients and potential health or environment benefits in food. A latent class model is used to analyse consumers’ preferences for GM food. There is considerable diversity amongst consumers in risk attitudes to GM food. The analysis reveals that trade-offs between risks and related concerns associated with GM food and benefits that may be associated with introduced health and environmental attributes of food depend upon individual’s characteristics. The findings have implications for public policies that seek to minimise the effects of perceived risk in food markets. Key words http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Review of Agricultural Economics Oxford University Press

Trading off health, environmental and genetic modification attributes in food

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Oxford University Press and the Foundation of the European Review of Agricultural Economics
ISSN
0165-1587
eISSN
1464-3618
DOI
10.1093/erae/31.3.389
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examines the trade-offs made by consumers between possible risks associated with genetically modified (GM) ingredients and potential health or environment benefits in food. A latent class model is used to analyse consumers’ preferences for GM food. There is considerable diversity amongst consumers in risk attitudes to GM food. The analysis reveals that trade-offs between risks and related concerns associated with GM food and benefits that may be associated with introduced health and environmental attributes of food depend upon individual’s characteristics. The findings have implications for public policies that seek to minimise the effects of perceived risk in food markets. Key words

Journal

European Review of Agricultural EconomicsOxford University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2004

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