The Value of Museum Collections for Research and Society

The Value of Museum Collections for Research and Society AbstractMany museums and academic institutions maintain first-rate collections of biological materials, ranging from preserved whole organisms to DNA libraries and cell lines. These biological collections make innumerable contributions to science and society in areas as divergent as homeland security, public health and safety, monitoring of environmental change, and traditional taxonomy and systematics. Moreover, these collections save governments and taxpayers many millions of dollars each year by effectively guiding government spending, preventing catastrophic events in public health and safety, eliminating redundancy, and securing natural and agricultural resources. However, these contributions are widely underappreciated by the public and by policymakers, resulting in insufficient financial support for maintenance and improvement of biological collections. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

The Value of Museum Collections for Research and Society

BioScience, Volume 54 (1) – Jan 1, 2004

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2004 American Institute of Biological Sciences
Subject
Departments
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
D.O.I.
10.1641/0006-3568(2004)054[0066:TVOMCF]2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractMany museums and academic institutions maintain first-rate collections of biological materials, ranging from preserved whole organisms to DNA libraries and cell lines. These biological collections make innumerable contributions to science and society in areas as divergent as homeland security, public health and safety, monitoring of environmental change, and traditional taxonomy and systematics. Moreover, these collections save governments and taxpayers many millions of dollars each year by effectively guiding government spending, preventing catastrophic events in public health and safety, eliminating redundancy, and securing natural and agricultural resources. However, these contributions are widely underappreciated by the public and by policymakers, resulting in insufficient financial support for maintenance and improvement of biological collections.

Journal

BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2004

Keywords: Keywords museum collections biological invasions global climate change public health safety national security

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