The relationships of plant and insect diversities in succession

The relationships of plant and insect diversities in succession The basic features of an intensive study on the various stages of a secondary succession, from fallow Held to birch woodland, are described. The α‐β diversities of the green plants, and two orders of insects, Hetcroptera and adult Coleoptera, are described. For the vegetation, in addition to taxonotnic diversity, structural diversity, with both spatial and architectural components, was recognized. It was found that up to a successional age of 16 months, the taxonomic diversities of plants and insects rose; thereafter the diversity of the plant species declined far more than the insect species diversity. It was concluded that in the later successional stages the maintenance of a high level of taxonomic diversity of these orders of insects is correlated with the rising structural diversity of the green plants, which virtually compensates for their falling taxonomic diversity. The larger fungi appear to show a similar trend to the insects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Journal of the Linnean Society Oxford University Press

The relationships of plant and insect diversities in succession

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0024-4066
eISSN
1095-8312
DOI
10.1111/j.1095-8312.1979.tb00063.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The basic features of an intensive study on the various stages of a secondary succession, from fallow Held to birch woodland, are described. The α‐β diversities of the green plants, and two orders of insects, Hetcroptera and adult Coleoptera, are described. For the vegetation, in addition to taxonotnic diversity, structural diversity, with both spatial and architectural components, was recognized. It was found that up to a successional age of 16 months, the taxonomic diversities of plants and insects rose; thereafter the diversity of the plant species declined far more than the insect species diversity. It was concluded that in the later successional stages the maintenance of a high level of taxonomic diversity of these orders of insects is correlated with the rising structural diversity of the green plants, which virtually compensates for their falling taxonomic diversity. The larger fungi appear to show a similar trend to the insects.

Journal

Biological Journal of the Linnean SocietyOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1979

References

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