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The market for social norms

The market for social norms This article presents a semirigorous model in which a new norm arises out of the workings of a market for norms. Change is triggered by a shift in either cost-benefit conditions or group composition. Because individuals are heterogeneous in important respects, they respond differently to these triggering events. The first persons to supply new norms generally are individuals who have either superior technical knowledge of cost-benefit conditions, superior social knowledge of group dynamics, or special endowments that provide them with unusually high tangible benefits from norm reform. Members of the social audience observe the competing efforts of these norm suppliers and reward the most meritorious ones by conferring on them either esteem or, according to an alternative conception, new exchange opportunities. Under optimal conditions, members of the audience - key participants in the demand side of the market for norms - do not free-ride because they incur no net costs when conferring their rewards. Oxford University Press « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Am Law Econ Rev (2001) 3 (1): 1-49. doi: 10.1093/aler/3.1.1 » Abstract Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Article Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Ellickson, R. Search for related content Related Content A13 - Relation of Economics to Social Values Z13 - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue Fall 2015 17 (2) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Rights & Permissions Dispatch date of the next issue We are mobile – find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The American Law and Economics Association Impact Factor: 0.735 5-Yr impact factor: 0.929 Editors-in-Chief Max Schanzenbach Northwestern University School of Law Abraham Wickelgren University of Texas at Austin View full editorial board For Authors Information for authors Author Self-Archiving Policy Submit now! Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Widget Get a widget var taxonomies = ("LAW00010", "SOC00720"); Most Most Read Crime and Expected Punishment: Changes in Perceptions at the Age of Criminal Majority Understanding the Democratic Transition in South Africa Does the "Community Prosecution" Strategy Reduce Crime? A Test of Chicago's Experience Prison Conditions and Recidivism Medical Marijuana Laws and Teen Marijuana Use » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Prison Conditions, Capital Punishment, and Deterrence Does Capital Punishment Have a Deterrent Effect? New Evidence from Postmoratorium Panel Data Do Harsher Prison Conditions Reduce Recidivism? 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Online ISSN 1465-7260 - Print ISSN 1465-7252 Copyright © 2015 American Law and Economics Association Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? 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The market for social norms

American Law and Economics Review , Volume 3 (1) – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 American Law and Economics Association
ISSN
1465-7252
eISSN
1465-7260
DOI
10.1093/aler/3.1.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article presents a semirigorous model in which a new norm arises out of the workings of a market for norms. Change is triggered by a shift in either cost-benefit conditions or group composition. Because individuals are heterogeneous in important respects, they respond differently to these triggering events. The first persons to supply new norms generally are individuals who have either superior technical knowledge of cost-benefit conditions, superior social knowledge of group dynamics, or special endowments that provide them with unusually high tangible benefits from norm reform. Members of the social audience observe the competing efforts of these norm suppliers and reward the most meritorious ones by conferring on them either esteem or, according to an alternative conception, new exchange opportunities. Under optimal conditions, members of the audience - key participants in the demand side of the market for norms - do not free-ride because they incur no net costs when conferring their rewards. Oxford University Press « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Am Law Econ Rev (2001) 3 (1): 1-49. doi: 10.1093/aler/3.1.1 » Abstract Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Article Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Ellickson, R. Search for related content Related Content A13 - Relation of Economics to Social Values Z13 - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue Fall 2015 17 (2) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Rights & Permissions Dispatch date of the next issue We are mobile – find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The American Law and Economics Association Impact Factor: 0.735 5-Yr impact factor: 0.929 Editors-in-Chief Max Schanzenbach Northwestern University School of Law Abraham Wickelgren University of Texas at Austin View full editorial board For Authors Information for authors Author Self-Archiving Policy Submit now! Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Widget Get a widget var taxonomies = ("LAW00010", "SOC00720"); Most Most Read Crime and Expected Punishment: Changes in Perceptions at the Age of Criminal Majority Understanding the Democratic Transition in South Africa Does the "Community Prosecution" Strategy Reduce Crime? A Test of Chicago's Experience Prison Conditions and Recidivism Medical Marijuana Laws and Teen Marijuana Use » View all Most Read articles Most Cited Prison Conditions, Capital Punishment, and Deterrence Does Capital Punishment Have a Deterrent Effect? New Evidence from Postmoratorium Panel Data Do Harsher Prison Conditions Reduce Recidivism? A Discontinuity-based Approach The Black-White Test Score Gap Through Third Grade Capitalizing on Segregation, Pretending Neutrality: College Admissions and the Texas Top 10% Law » View all Most Cited articles Disclaimer: Please note that abstracts for content published before 1996 were created through digital scanning and may therefore not exactly replicate the text of the original print issues. All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, but the Publisher will not be held responsible for any remaining inaccuracies. If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department. Online ISSN 1465-7260 - Print ISSN 1465-7252 Copyright © 2015 American Law and Economics Association Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? 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Journal

American Law and Economics ReviewOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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