The Interplay of Nutrition, Physical Activity, Severity of Illness, and Mortality in Critically Ill Burn Patients: Is There a Connection?

The Interplay of Nutrition, Physical Activity, Severity of Illness, and Mortality in Critically... Abstract The purpose of this project was to evaluate the relationships between nutrition, physical activity levels, severity of illness, and survival in critically ill burn patients. We conducted a retrospective evaluation of consecutively admitted adult patients who had an intensive care unit stay ≥8 days after ≥20% total body surface area burns. Linear regression was used to assess the association between severity of illness (sequential organ failure assessment scores) and physical activity levels as well as between severity of illness and nutritional intake. After univariate analysis comparing survivors and non-survivors, factors with p<0.10 were analyzed with multiple logistic regression. Characteristics of the 45 included patients were: 42 ± 15 years old, 37 ± 17% total body surface area burns, 22% mortality. Factors independently associated with survival were burn size (negatively) (p=0.018), height (positively) (p=0.006), highest physical activity level during the first 8 intensive care unit days (positively) (p=0.016), and kcal balance during the fifth through the eighth intensive care unit days (positively) (p=0.012). Sequential organ failure assessment scores had a significant (p<0.001) but weak association with nutrition intake (R2=0.05) and physical activity levels (R2=0.25). Higher nutritional intake and activity were significantly associated with lower mortality in critically ill burn patients. Given the weak associations between both nutritional intake and physical activity levels with severity of illness, the primary barrier in achieving nutrition and activity goals was not severity of illness. We recommend that physical rehabilitation and nutritional intake be optimized in an effort to improve outcomes in critically ill burn patients. nutrition, activity, rehabilitation, burn, survival, severity of illness This content is only available as a PDF. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Burn Association 2019. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Burn Care & Research Oxford University Press

The Interplay of Nutrition, Physical Activity, Severity of Illness, and Mortality in Critically Ill Burn Patients: Is There a Connection?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/oxford-university-press/the-interplay-of-nutrition-physical-activity-severity-of-illness-and-02L28sKzFG
Copyright
Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Burn Association 2019. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
ISSN
1559-047X
eISSN
1559-0488
D.O.I.
10.1093/jbcr/irz126
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The purpose of this project was to evaluate the relationships between nutrition, physical activity levels, severity of illness, and survival in critically ill burn patients. We conducted a retrospective evaluation of consecutively admitted adult patients who had an intensive care unit stay ≥8 days after ≥20% total body surface area burns. Linear regression was used to assess the association between severity of illness (sequential organ failure assessment scores) and physical activity levels as well as between severity of illness and nutritional intake. After univariate analysis comparing survivors and non-survivors, factors with p<0.10 were analyzed with multiple logistic regression. Characteristics of the 45 included patients were: 42 ± 15 years old, 37 ± 17% total body surface area burns, 22% mortality. Factors independently associated with survival were burn size (negatively) (p=0.018), height (positively) (p=0.006), highest physical activity level during the first 8 intensive care unit days (positively) (p=0.016), and kcal balance during the fifth through the eighth intensive care unit days (positively) (p=0.012). Sequential organ failure assessment scores had a significant (p<0.001) but weak association with nutrition intake (R2=0.05) and physical activity levels (R2=0.25). Higher nutritional intake and activity were significantly associated with lower mortality in critically ill burn patients. Given the weak associations between both nutritional intake and physical activity levels with severity of illness, the primary barrier in achieving nutrition and activity goals was not severity of illness. We recommend that physical rehabilitation and nutritional intake be optimized in an effort to improve outcomes in critically ill burn patients. nutrition, activity, rehabilitation, burn, survival, severity of illness This content is only available as a PDF. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Burn Association 2019. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

Journal

Journal of Burn Care & ResearchOxford University Press

Published: Jan 8, 17

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off