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THE IMPACT OF TELEVISION ADVERTISING: LEARNING WITHOUT INVOLVEMENT

THE IMPACT OF TELEVISION ADVERTISING: LEARNING WITHOUT INVOLVEMENT Abstract Does television advertising produce sales by changing attitudes? Not always, says Herbert E. Krugman in his presidential address before the American Association for Public Opinion Research on May 15, 1965. It may do so, he states, just by changing perceptions of the product in the course of merely shifting the relative salience of attitudes, especially when the purchaser is not particularly involved in the message. This arresting thesis has important implications for noncommercial as well as commercial persuasion efforts. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1965, the American Association for Public Opinion Research http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Opinion Quarterly Oxford University Press

THE IMPACT OF TELEVISION ADVERTISING: LEARNING WITHOUT INVOLVEMENT

Public Opinion Quarterly , Volume 29 (3) – Jan 1, 1965

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1965, the American Association for Public Opinion Research
ISSN
0033-362X
eISSN
1537-5331
DOI
10.1086/267335
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Does television advertising produce sales by changing attitudes? Not always, says Herbert E. Krugman in his presidential address before the American Association for Public Opinion Research on May 15, 1965. It may do so, he states, just by changing perceptions of the product in the course of merely shifting the relative salience of attitudes, especially when the purchaser is not particularly involved in the message. This arresting thesis has important implications for noncommercial as well as commercial persuasion efforts. This content is only available as a PDF. © 1965, the American Association for Public Opinion Research

Journal

Public Opinion QuarterlyOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1965

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