The Cultural Shaping of ICTs within Academic Fields: Corpus‐based Linguistics as a Case Study

The Cultural Shaping of ICTs within Academic Fields: Corpus‐based Linguistics as a Case Study The aim of this paper is to show that the appropriation of ICTs is determined by a field’s specific cultural identity. Knowledge is not a homogeneous whole, but a patchwork of heterogeneous fields. These fields are most visible as embodied in academic disciplines, which have distinct cultural identities shaped by intellectual and social considerations. Scholarly communication systems evolve over time within the context of these cultural identities. The paper discusses the cultural shaping of ICTs by drawing on an ongoing ethnographic study within corpus‐based linguistics. The findings suggest that cultural elements such as ‘task‐uncertainty’, ‘mutual‐dependency’, heterogeneity, and institutional configurations will influence the appropriateness of a specific ICT infrastructure for a particular intellectual community. For example, fields that have a highly politicized and tightly controlled research culture will develop a coherent field‐based strategy for the uptake and use of ICTs, whereas domains that are pluralistic and have a loosely organized research culture will appropriate ICTs in an ad‐hoc localized manner. These findings demonstrate that overlooking cultural diversity in the development and implementation of ICT infrastructures and policies could prove detrimental for fields that do not map onto ‘big science’ conceptualizations of knowledge production. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates that effective understanding similarity and difference in patterns of scholarly communication needs to take the fine‐grain of specialist fields as the unit of analysis, rather than the course‐grain of the discipline. Copyright Association for Literary & Linguistic Computing 2004 « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Lit Linguist Computing (2004) 19 (3): 303-319. doi: 10.1093/llc/19.3.303 » Abstract Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Article Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Fry, J. Search for related content Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue December 2014 29 (4) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Publishers' Books for Review Rights & Permissions Dispatch date of the next issue We are mobile – find out more This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) Published on behalf of European Association for Digital Humanities (EADH) Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO) Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) Canadian Society for Digital Humanities / Société canadienne des humanités numériques (CSDH/SCHN) Australasian Association for Digital Humanities (AADH) centerNet Japanese Association for Digital Humanities (JADH) Editor Edward Vanhoutte View full editorial board Impact Factor: 0.475 Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements var taxonomies = ("AHU01230", "AHU01320", "AHU01565", "SCI01720", "SOC00496"); Most Most Read Constructing a roadmap to more systematic and successful online reading and vocabulary acquisition Longitudinal detection of dementia through lexical and syntactic changes in writing: a case study of three British novelists Well Connected to Your Digital Object? 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If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department. Online ISSN 2055-768X - Print ISSN 2055-7671 Copyright © 2015 EADH: The European Association for Digital Humanities Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? 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The Cultural Shaping of ICTs within Academic Fields: Corpus‐based Linguistics as a Case Study

Literary and Linguistic Computing, Volume 19 (3) – Sep 1, 2004

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 EADH: The European Association for Digital Humanities
ISSN
0268-1145
eISSN
1477-4615
DOI
10.1093/llc/19.3.303
Publisher site
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Abstract

The aim of this paper is to show that the appropriation of ICTs is determined by a field’s specific cultural identity. Knowledge is not a homogeneous whole, but a patchwork of heterogeneous fields. These fields are most visible as embodied in academic disciplines, which have distinct cultural identities shaped by intellectual and social considerations. Scholarly communication systems evolve over time within the context of these cultural identities. The paper discusses the cultural shaping of ICTs by drawing on an ongoing ethnographic study within corpus‐based linguistics. The findings suggest that cultural elements such as ‘task‐uncertainty’, ‘mutual‐dependency’, heterogeneity, and institutional configurations will influence the appropriateness of a specific ICT infrastructure for a particular intellectual community. For example, fields that have a highly politicized and tightly controlled research culture will develop a coherent field‐based strategy for the uptake and use of ICTs, whereas domains that are pluralistic and have a loosely organized research culture will appropriate ICTs in an ad‐hoc localized manner. These findings demonstrate that overlooking cultural diversity in the development and implementation of ICT infrastructures and policies could prove detrimental for fields that do not map onto ‘big science’ conceptualizations of knowledge production. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates that effective understanding similarity and difference in patterns of scholarly communication needs to take the fine‐grain of specialist fields as the unit of analysis, rather than the course‐grain of the discipline. Copyright Association for Literary & Linguistic Computing 2004 « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Lit Linguist Computing (2004) 19 (3): 303-319. doi: 10.1093/llc/19.3.303 » Abstract Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Article Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Fry, J. Search for related content Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue December 2014 29 (4) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Publishers' Books for Review Rights & Permissions Dispatch date of the next issue We are mobile – find out more This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) Published on behalf of European Association for Digital Humanities (EADH) Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO) Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) Canadian Society for Digital Humanities / Société canadienne des humanités numériques (CSDH/SCHN) Australasian Association for Digital Humanities (AADH) centerNet Japanese Association for Digital Humanities (JADH) Editor Edward Vanhoutte View full editorial board Impact Factor: 0.475 Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements var taxonomies = ("AHU01230", "AHU01320", "AHU01565", "SCI01720", "SOC00496"); Most Most Read Constructing a roadmap to more systematic and successful online reading and vocabulary acquisition Longitudinal detection of dementia through lexical and syntactic changes in writing: a case study of three British novelists Well Connected to Your Digital Object? E-Curator: A Web-based e-Science Platform for Museum Artefacts Quantitative Authorship Attribution: An Evaluation of Techniques Joint and multi-authored publication patterns in the Digital Humanities » View all Most Read articles Most Cited 'Delta': a Measure of Stylistic Difference and a Guide to Likely Authorship Testing Burrows's Delta Outside the cave of shadows: using syntactic annotation to enhance authorship attribution Quantitative Authorship Attribution: An Evaluation of Techniques A comparative study of machine learning methods for authorship attribution » View all Most Cited articles Disclaimer: Please note that abstracts for content published before 1996 were created through digital scanning and may therefore not exactly replicate the text of the original print issues. All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, but the Publisher will not be held responsible for any remaining inaccuracies. If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department. Online ISSN 2055-768X - Print ISSN 2055-7671 Copyright © 2015 EADH: The European Association for Digital Humanities Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-189672-16"); pageTracker._setDomainName(".oxfordjournals.org"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {}

Journal

Literary and Linguistic ComputingOxford University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2004

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