The Costs and Effectiveness of Funding the Conservation of Australian Threatened Birds

The Costs and Effectiveness of Funding the Conservation of Australian Threatened Birds AbstractA review of funding for conservation of threatened birds in Australia over the period 1993–2000 shows that most of the funds were spent on the taxa closest to extinction. Government conservation agencies provided the majority of funds, with 25 percent coming from the voluntary conservation sector and about 14 percent from the business sector and government agencies whose primary mission is not conservation. Taxa that are taxonomically distinct received more funds than would be expected by an even distribution, but nevertheless substantial funds were allocated even to Australian populations of taxa that are not threatened globally. The status of most taxa did not change during the study period, but those that did improve generally received more funds than those taxa that declined. Overall, funds provided to support Australian threatened birds have been used effectively, but more is required to secure all taxa, and investment in threatened species will have to continue well into the future. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

The Costs and Effectiveness of Funding the Conservation of Australian Threatened Birds

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
Subject
Departments
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
D.O.I.
10.1641/0006-3568(2003)053[0658:TCAEOF]2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractA review of funding for conservation of threatened birds in Australia over the period 1993–2000 shows that most of the funds were spent on the taxa closest to extinction. Government conservation agencies provided the majority of funds, with 25 percent coming from the voluntary conservation sector and about 14 percent from the business sector and government agencies whose primary mission is not conservation. Taxa that are taxonomically distinct received more funds than would be expected by an even distribution, but nevertheless substantial funds were allocated even to Australian populations of taxa that are not threatened globally. The status of most taxa did not change during the study period, but those that did improve generally received more funds than those taxa that declined. Overall, funds provided to support Australian threatened birds have been used effectively, but more is required to secure all taxa, and investment in threatened species will have to continue well into the future.

Journal

BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Jul 1, 2003

Keywords: Keywords conservation costs threatened Australian birds

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