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The Conduction of Geotropic Excitation in Roots

The Conduction of Geotropic Excitation in Roots Downloaded from aob.oxfordjournals.org at Infovell on November 13, 2010 With four Figures in the Text. /'~ A ASES have long been known in which stimulus striking on one part of v_x a plant organ leads to a responsive movement in another part: we have to suppose that the excitation set up in the perceptive region is conducted along the plant organ to the region of response. Such conduction seems to offer special opportunities for investigating what is the nature of the excitation conducted. But further interest attaches to those cases where the responsive curvature is carried out in a direction determined by the direction of the stimulus. For in these the intercalated phase of conduction seems to make it possible to examine <in what way the direction of stimulus thus determines the direction of response. Amongst the best-known plant organs which show such conduction are roots and the so-called cotyledon of grass seedlings. In these, as shown by Ciesielski for the former and Rothert (1896) for the latter, excitation can be conducted back from the tip to produce a curvature in the elongating region. A great advance was made when it was discovered by Boysen-Jensen (1913) that in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Botany Oxford University Press

The Conduction of Geotropic Excitation in Roots

Abstract

Downloaded from aob.oxfordjournals.org at Infovell on November 13, 2010 With four Figures in the Text. /'~ A ASES have long been known in which stimulus striking on one part of v_x a plant organ leads to a responsive movement in another part: we have to suppose that the excitation set up in the perceptive region is conducted along the plant organ to the region of response. Such conduction seems to offer special opportunities for investigating what is the nature of the excitation conducted. But further interest attaches to those cases where the responsive curvature is carried out in a direction determined by the direction of the stimulus. For in these the intercalated phase of conduction seems to make it possible to examine <in what way the direction of stimulus thus determines the direction of response. Amongst the best-known plant organs which show such conduction are roots and the so-called cotyledon of grass seedlings. In these, as shown by Ciesielski for the former and Rothert (1896) for the latter, excitation can be conducted back from the tip to produce a curvature in the elongating region. A great advance was made when it was discovered by Boysen-Jensen (1913) that in
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