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The Communication Process as Evaluative Context: What Do Nonscientists Hear When Scientists Speak?

The Communication Process as Evaluative Context: What Do Nonscientists Hear When Scientists Speak? Articles The Communication Process as Evaluative Context: What Do Nonscientists Hear When Scientists Speak? JAMES R. WEBER AND CHARLOTTE SCHELL WORD The cause and root of nearly all evils in science is this—that SCIENTISTS AND NONSCIENTISTS BENEFIT while we falsely admire and extol the powers of the human mind, we neglect to seek for its true helps. BY RECOGNIZING THAT ATTEMPTS AT Francis Bacon Aphorism IX, Novum Organum MUTUAL INFLUENCE, MULTIPLE FRAMES OF n the first paragraph of a letter in the “Science’s REFERENCE, AND “OBJECTIVE” INFORMA- ICompass” section of Science (Bazzaz et al. 1998), a group TION IN SCIENCE COMMUNICATION ARE of eminent ecologists notes that good science used to involve doing first-rate research and publishing it in the scientific lit- NOT NEUTRAL BUT EVALUATED WITH erature. Now, however, they note a third necessary activity: “in- forming the general public (and especially taxpayers) of the OTHER SOCIAL INFLUENCES relevance and importance of our work. We are convinced that this applies to even the most esoteric of ‘basic’ research, be- cause understanding how the world works is fundamental to arrangements, and improved mechanisms to disseminate both satisfying natural human curiosity and solving the hu- and utilize knowledge more quickly” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioScience Oxford University Press

The Communication Process as Evaluative Context: What Do Nonscientists Hear When Scientists Speak?

BioScience , Volume 51 (6) – Jun 1, 2001

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2001 American Institute of Biological Sciences
Subject
Overview Articles
ISSN
0006-3568
eISSN
1525-3244
DOI
10.1641/0006-3568(2001)051[0487:TCPAEC]2.0.CO;2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Articles The Communication Process as Evaluative Context: What Do Nonscientists Hear When Scientists Speak? JAMES R. WEBER AND CHARLOTTE SCHELL WORD The cause and root of nearly all evils in science is this—that SCIENTISTS AND NONSCIENTISTS BENEFIT while we falsely admire and extol the powers of the human mind, we neglect to seek for its true helps. BY RECOGNIZING THAT ATTEMPTS AT Francis Bacon Aphorism IX, Novum Organum MUTUAL INFLUENCE, MULTIPLE FRAMES OF n the first paragraph of a letter in the “Science’s REFERENCE, AND “OBJECTIVE” INFORMA- ICompass” section of Science (Bazzaz et al. 1998), a group TION IN SCIENCE COMMUNICATION ARE of eminent ecologists notes that good science used to involve doing first-rate research and publishing it in the scientific lit- NOT NEUTRAL BUT EVALUATED WITH erature. Now, however, they note a third necessary activity: “in- forming the general public (and especially taxpayers) of the OTHER SOCIAL INFLUENCES relevance and importance of our work. We are convinced that this applies to even the most esoteric of ‘basic’ research, be- cause understanding how the world works is fundamental to arrangements, and improved mechanisms to disseminate both satisfying natural human curiosity and solving the hu- and utilize knowledge more quickly”

Journal

BioScienceOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2001

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