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THE BORDER-LAND OF EPILEPSY REVISITED : THE SEVENTH GOWERS MEMORIAL LECTURE

BY Downloaded from brain.oxfordjournals.org at Infovell on November 20, 2010 (From the National Hospital, Queen Square, London WCl, and St. George's Hospital, London SWl) SIR WILLIAM GOWERS, whom we commemorate today, was primarily a renowned clinician and clinical teacher and writer who worked at this Hospital and at University College Hospital. His other larger volumes on epilepsy (Gowers, 1881 and 1901) are now neurological classics, but when his name is mentioned there first springs to mind his little gem of medical science, "The Border-Land of Epilepsy," published in 1907 and read by all of us. The substance of that slim volume is not literally clinical, for it did not entail bedside observation; it recorded the stories of patients with episodic disorders, the questions those stories posed, and some of Gowers' answers to them or speculations upon them. In half a dozen chapters he dealt with fainting, vagal and vaso-vagal attacks, vertigo, migraine, and, quite briefly and almost inconsequentially, sleep disorders. It is essentially nosological, concerned with the differentiation of syndromes; it considers the disturbed physiology which may underlie them but by present standards there is little of aetiology. Remote and hypothetical factors of inheritance and immediate precipitants such http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Oxford University Press

THE BORDER-LAND OF EPILEPSY REVISITED : THE SEVENTH GOWERS MEMORIAL LECTURE

Abstract

BY Downloaded from brain.oxfordjournals.org at Infovell on November 20, 2010 (From the National Hospital, Queen Square, London WCl, and St. George's Hospital, London SWl) SIR WILLIAM GOWERS, whom we commemorate today, was primarily a renowned clinician and clinical teacher and writer who worked at this Hospital and at University College Hospital. His other larger volumes on epilepsy (Gowers, 1881 and 1901) are now neurological classics, but when his name is mentioned there first springs to mind his little gem of medical science, "The Border-Land of Epilepsy," published in 1907 and read by all of us. The substance of that slim volume is not literally clinical, for it did not entail bedside observation; it recorded the stories of patients with episodic disorders, the questions those stories posed, and some of Gowers' answers to them or speculations upon them. In half a dozen chapters he dealt with fainting, vagal and vaso-vagal attacks, vertigo, migraine, and, quite briefly and almost inconsequentially, sleep disorders. It is essentially nosological, concerned with the differentiation of syndromes; it considers the disturbed physiology which may underlie them but by present standards there is little of aetiology. Remote and hypothetical factors of inheritance and immediate precipitants such
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