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The American Temperance Movement and Market-Based Violence

The American Temperance Movement and Market-Based Violence The net impact of market legality on crime is ambiguous if consumption of the illegally traded good causes violence. With modern crime data, I show that drug control policy that increases market-based violence while reducing violence associated with intoxication raises homicide rates for individuals in their 20s relative to older and younger people. Using a state-level panel of age-specific homicides from 1900 to 1940, when many states and eventually the federal government criminalized alcohol markets, I demonstrate that the spread of the temperance movement similarly compressed the age distribution of homicide victims, primarily in northern, urban states with large immigrant populations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Law and Economics Review Oxford University Press

The American Temperance Movement and Market-Based Violence

American Law and Economics Review , Volume 16 (2) – Dec 19, 2014

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Law and Economics Association. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissionsoup.com.
ISSN
1465-7252
eISSN
1465-7260
DOI
10.1093/aler/ahu009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The net impact of market legality on crime is ambiguous if consumption of the illegally traded good causes violence. With modern crime data, I show that drug control policy that increases market-based violence while reducing violence associated with intoxication raises homicide rates for individuals in their 20s relative to older and younger people. Using a state-level panel of age-specific homicides from 1900 to 1940, when many states and eventually the federal government criminalized alcohol markets, I demonstrate that the spread of the temperance movement similarly compressed the age distribution of homicide victims, primarily in northern, urban states with large immigrant populations.

Journal

American Law and Economics ReviewOxford University Press

Published: Dec 19, 2014

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