Studying metapopulation effects in predator‐prey systems

Studying metapopulation effects in predator‐prey systems It has been suggested that many predator‐prey systems persist, despite unstable local interactions, due to metapopulation processes: movement of individuals among largely independent local populations. I review 13 possible examples of this phenomenon all I could find in the literature—and find that each either lacks convincing data or is not a true metapopulation. Most of the examples rely on evidence of local extinction and recolonization, only a few using direct experimental methods; I discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these methods, as well as alternatives. I also consider the ways these systems deviate from having pure metapopulation structures, and conclude that most large‐scale spatial population structures will not fit cleanly into a metapopulation vs. within‐population dichotomy, but rather combine features of both. This will necessitate use of powerful and focused methodology (in particular, experimentation) to directly describe movement rates and patterns, rather than use of crude observational data (e.g. extinctions) to make inferences about movement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Journal of the Linnean Society Oxford University Press

Studying metapopulation effects in predator‐prey systems

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0024-4066
eISSN
1095-8312
DOI
10.1111/j.1095-8312.1991.tb00565.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It has been suggested that many predator‐prey systems persist, despite unstable local interactions, due to metapopulation processes: movement of individuals among largely independent local populations. I review 13 possible examples of this phenomenon all I could find in the literature—and find that each either lacks convincing data or is not a true metapopulation. Most of the examples rely on evidence of local extinction and recolonization, only a few using direct experimental methods; I discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these methods, as well as alternatives. I also consider the ways these systems deviate from having pure metapopulation structures, and conclude that most large‐scale spatial population structures will not fit cleanly into a metapopulation vs. within‐population dichotomy, but rather combine features of both. This will necessitate use of powerful and focused methodology (in particular, experimentation) to directly describe movement rates and patterns, rather than use of crude observational data (e.g. extinctions) to make inferences about movement.

Journal

Biological Journal of the Linnean SocietyOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1991

References

  • Predation and dynamics of prey populations
    MURDOCH, MURDOCH
  • An acarine predator‐prey metapopulation system inhabiting greenhouse cucumbers
    NACHMAN, NACHMAN
  • Predator‐prey interactions and community structure: chironomids, mosquitoes and copepods in Heliconia imbricata (Musaceae)
    NAEEM, NAEEM
  • An experimental analysis of patch size, habitat subdivision, and extinction in a marine intertidal snail
    QUINN, QUINN; WOLIN, WOLIN; JUDGE, JUDGE
  • Metapopulation persistence despite local extinction: predator‐prey patch models of the Lotka‐Volterra type
    SABELIS, SABELIS; DIEKMANN, DIEKMANN; JANSEN, JANSEN
  • Lizards reduce food consumption by spiders: mechanisms and consequences
    SPILLER, SPILLER; SCHOENER, SCHOENER

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