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SOIL APPLIED INSECTICIDAL CONTROL OF ASIAN CITRUS PSYLLID AND CITRUS LEAFMINER, 2010

SOIL APPLIED INSECTICIDAL CONTROL OF ASIAN CITRUS PSYLLID AND CITRUS LEAFMINER, 2010 Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.D15 (D15) ORANGE: Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck, ‘Hamlin” Philip A. Stansly University of Florida/ IFAS Southwest Florida Res. and Ed. Center 2686 State Road 29 North Immokalee, FL 34142-9515 Phone: (239) 658-3400 Fax: (239) 658-3469 Email: pstansly@ufl.edu, Barry Kostyk Email: bkostyk@ufl.edu Asian citrus psyllid (ACP): Diaphorina citri Kuwayama Citrus leafminer (CLM): Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton ACP and CLM are economically important pests of Florida citrus due to direct damage of new shoots and especially, their role in spreading of greening disease (“huanglongbing”) or exacerbating citrus canker, respectively. The trial was conducted at the University of Florida Southwest Research and Education Center in Immokalee, Florida, on young ‘Hamlin’ orange trees budded to ‘US-802’ pummalo x trifoliate rootstock and planted May 2010, 8 ft apart within rows spaced at 18 ft. However, rates per acre were based on an assumed density of 145 trees per acre. Five treatments were assigned to 6-tree plots in an RCB design with 4 replicates. Weeds, debris and leaf litter were removed from beneath each tree prior to application. An 8 oz suspension was applied 19, 20 Jul to bare soil within 8 inches of the trunk of the tree using an EZ-Dose® sprayer operating at a pressure of 45 PSI and a flow rate of 3.7 gpm. Trees were sampled when new growth (flush) was available, but only CLM were found in 2010. Five young shoots were sampled per plot and larvae counted from 3 leaves per shoot using a stereoscopic microscope. On 4 Mar 2011, one branch on two trees per each plot was caged with a Trimaco 1 gallon Elastic Top Paint Strainer (nylon mesh) into which 15 adult ACP obtained from a lab reared colony were released. Cages were removed 17 days later on 21 Mar. Five flushes per plot were sampled at that time and again on 19 Apr when leafminers larvae were also present. Psyllid eggs and nymphs and CLM larvae were counted as above. The procedure was repeated on 27 Apr 2011 with 10 adult ACP obtained from a lab-reared colony that were left in the cages for 14 d. Ten shoots per treatment were again sampled and psyllid egg, nymphs and leafminer larvae counted as before. All treatments significantly reduced the number of CLM larvae compared to the untreated control through 8 Nov, with all but Admire Pro still showing activity on 11 May (295-296 DAT) (Table 1). All treatments significantly reduced the number of psyllid eggs on 21 Mar as did the high and low rates of HGW 20 SC on 19 Apr (273-274 DAT) (Table 2). All treatments reduced the number of ACP nymphs on 19 Apr. The middle and high rates of HGW 20 SC still showed activity on 11 May, with the high rate reducing infested flush to 40% from 100%. Thus all rates of HGW 20 SC remained active against CLM in these young trees for almost 10 months as did the medium and high rate against ACP. Even at the lowest rate of 10.25 oz/ac suppressed ACP for 9 months. Excessively prolonged residual activity would also prolong selection for resistance. Lower rates sufficient to protect trees of this size for no more than 3 months would allow time within the same season to rotate modes of action as a resistance management strategy. 1 Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.D15 Table 1 Leafminer larvae per 3 leaves Rate Product/acre 10-Sep 23-Sep 8-Nov 19 Apr 11 May Untreated 4.40a 15.70a 5.25a 2.33a 2.10a Admire Pro 4.6 SC 7.0 fl. oz 0.00b 0.00b 0.40b 1.40ab 1.40ab Platinum 75 WG 2.67 oz 0.00b 0.10b 0.55b 0.63bc 0.80bc HGW 20 SC 10.25 fl. oz 0.00b 0.00b 0.40b 0.06c 0.00c HGW 20 SC 15.38 fl. oz 0.00b 0.00b 0.00b 0.06c 0.00c HGW 20 SC 24.97 fl. oz 0.00b 0.00b 0.00b 0.00c 0.00c Means followed by same letter within a column are not statistically different LSD P>0.05) Table 2 21 Mar 19 Apr 11 May Treatment Rate/acre Eggs Nymphs Eggs Nymphs Nymphs Infested Shoots (%) Untreated 21.85a 3.85 13.07ab 42.40a 92.10a 100 Admire Pro 7.0 fl. oz 5.30b 1.35 5.53bc 26.07ab 57.60ab 100 Platinum 75 WG 2.67 fl. oz 1.60b 0.40 16.56a 19.25bc 44.90ab 100 HGW 20 SC 10.25 fl. oz 2.05b 0.65 0.75c 0.31c 61.90ab 100 HGW 20 SC 15.38 fl. oz 0.55b 0.05 6.63bc 9.31bc 11.90b 80 HGW 20 SC 24.97 fl. oz 4.10b 2.55 0.25c 0.25c 13.00b 40 Means followed by same letter within a column are not statistically different LSD P>0.05) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arthropod Management Tests Oxford University Press

SOIL APPLIED INSECTICIDAL CONTROL OF ASIAN CITRUS PSYLLID AND CITRUS LEAFMINER, 2010

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Abstract

Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.D15 (D15) ORANGE: Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck, ‘Hamlin” Philip A. Stansly University of Florida/ IFAS Southwest Florida Res. and Ed. Center 2686 State Road 29 North Immokalee, FL 34142-9515 Phone: (239) 658-3400 Fax: (239) 658-3469 Email: pstansly@ufl.edu, Barry Kostyk Email: bkostyk@ufl.edu Asian citrus psyllid (ACP): Diaphorina citri Kuwayama Citrus leafminer (CLM): Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton ACP and CLM are economically important pests of Florida citrus due to direct damage of new shoots and especially, their role in spreading of greening disease (“huanglongbing”) or exacerbating citrus canker, respectively. The trial was conducted at the University of Florida Southwest Research and Education Center in Immokalee, Florida, on young ‘Hamlin’ orange trees budded to ‘US-802’ pummalo x trifoliate rootstock and planted May 2010, 8 ft apart within rows spaced at 18 ft. However, rates per acre were based on an assumed density of 145 trees per acre. Five treatments were assigned to 6-tree plots in an RCB design with 4 replicates. Weeds, debris and leaf litter were removed from beneath each tree prior to application. An 8 oz suspension was applied 19, 20 Jul to bare soil within 8 inches of the trunk of the tree using an EZ-Dose® sprayer operating at a pressure of 45 PSI and a flow rate of 3.7 gpm. Trees were sampled when new growth (flush) was available, but only CLM were found in 2010. Five young shoots were sampled per plot and larvae counted from 3 leaves per shoot using a stereoscopic microscope. On 4 Mar 2011, one branch on two trees per each plot was caged with a Trimaco 1 gallon Elastic Top Paint Strainer (nylon mesh) into which 15 adult ACP obtained from a lab reared colony were released. Cages were removed 17 days later on 21 Mar. Five flushes per plot were sampled at that time and again on 19 Apr when leafminers larvae were also present. Psyllid eggs and nymphs and CLM larvae were counted as above. The procedure was repeated on 27 Apr 2011 with 10 adult ACP obtained from a lab-reared colony that were left in the cages for 14 d. Ten shoots per treatment were again sampled and psyllid egg, nymphs and leafminer larvae counted as before. All treatments significantly reduced the number of CLM larvae compared to the untreated control through 8 Nov, with all but Admire Pro still showing activity on 11 May (295-296 DAT) (Table 1). All treatments significantly reduced the number of psyllid eggs on 21 Mar as did the high and low rates of HGW 20 SC on 19 Apr (273-274 DAT) (Table 2). All treatments reduced the number of ACP nymphs on 19 Apr. The middle and high rates of HGW 20 SC still showed activity on 11 May, with the high rate reducing infested flush to 40% from 100%. Thus all rates of HGW 20 SC remained active against CLM in these young trees for almost 10 months as did the medium and high rate against ACP. Even at the lowest rate of 10.25 oz/ac suppressed ACP for 9 months. Excessively prolonged residual activity would also prolong selection for resistance. Lower rates sufficient to protect trees of this size for no more than 3 months would allow time within the same season to rotate modes of action as a resistance management strategy. 1 Arthropod Management Tests 2012, Vol. 37 doi: 10.4182/amt.2012.D15 Table 1 Leafminer larvae per 3 leaves Rate Product/acre 10-Sep 23-Sep 8-Nov 19 Apr 11 May Untreated 4.40a 15.70a 5.25a 2.33a 2.10a Admire Pro 4.6 SC 7.0 fl. oz 0.00b 0.00b 0.40b 1.40ab 1.40ab Platinum 75 WG 2.67 oz 0.00b 0.10b 0.55b 0.63bc 0.80bc HGW 20 SC 10.25 fl. oz 0.00b 0.00b 0.40b 0.06c 0.00c HGW 20 SC 15.38 fl. oz 0.00b 0.00b 0.00b 0.06c 0.00c HGW 20 SC 24.97 fl. oz 0.00b 0.00b 0.00b 0.00c 0.00c Means followed by same letter within a column are not statistically different LSD P>0.05) Table 2 21 Mar 19 Apr 11 May Treatment Rate/acre Eggs Nymphs Eggs Nymphs Nymphs Infested Shoots (%) Untreated 21.85a 3.85 13.07ab 42.40a 92.10a 100 Admire Pro 7.0 fl. oz 5.30b 1.35 5.53bc 26.07ab 57.60ab 100 Platinum 75 WG 2.67 fl. oz 1.60b 0.40 16.56a 19.25bc 44.90ab 100 HGW 20 SC 10.25 fl. oz 2.05b 0.65 0.75c 0.31c 61.90ab 100 HGW 20 SC 15.38 fl. oz 0.55b 0.05 6.63bc 9.31bc 11.90b 80 HGW 20 SC 24.97 fl. oz 4.10b 2.55 0.25c 0.25c 13.00b 40 Means followed by same letter within a column are not statistically different LSD P>0.05)

Journal

Arthropod Management TestsOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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