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Social Interaction and Life Satisfaction: An Empirical Assessment of Late-Life Patterns

Social Interaction and Life Satisfaction: An Empirical Assessment of Late-Life Patterns Abstract Problems of social and psychological adjustment in later life have been examined by numerous investigators. Some have found positive relationships between social interaction and personal adjustment, while others have found interaction and adjustment to be unrelated. The purpose of the research reported here was to examine how different ways of measuring interaction may affect its relationship with personal adjustment. Data were obtained in interviews with 218 noninstitutionalized persons aged 70 and older. Findings indicate that both the number of persons interacted with, and the frequency of this interaction, are of little importance for the adjustment of older people. We suggest that the quality, rather than quantity, of social interaction is crucial to understanding adaptations to old age. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes 1 Journal Paper No. J-8664 of the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station, Ames, Iowa. Project No. 1871. The authors wish to acknowledge the anonymous referees for their assistance on a draft of this article previously submitted to the Journal of Gerontology. © 1979 The Gerontological Society of America http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Gerontology Oxford University Press

Social Interaction and Life Satisfaction: An Empirical Assessment of Late-Life Patterns

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 1979 The Gerontological Society of America
ISSN
0022-1422
DOI
10.1093/geronj/34.1.116
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Problems of social and psychological adjustment in later life have been examined by numerous investigators. Some have found positive relationships between social interaction and personal adjustment, while others have found interaction and adjustment to be unrelated. The purpose of the research reported here was to examine how different ways of measuring interaction may affect its relationship with personal adjustment. Data were obtained in interviews with 218 noninstitutionalized persons aged 70 and older. Findings indicate that both the number of persons interacted with, and the frequency of this interaction, are of little importance for the adjustment of older people. We suggest that the quality, rather than quantity, of social interaction is crucial to understanding adaptations to old age. This content is only available as a PDF. Author notes 1 Journal Paper No. J-8664 of the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station, Ames, Iowa. Project No. 1871. The authors wish to acknowledge the anonymous referees for their assistance on a draft of this article previously submitted to the Journal of Gerontology. © 1979 The Gerontological Society of America

Journal

Journal of GerontologyOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1979

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