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Role and Interpersonal Style as Components of Social Interaction

Role and Interpersonal Style as Components of Social Interaction Abstract Twenty pairs of students role-played a situation in which one friend discovered the other making harmful comments about him to a third party. When completed, the same scene was role-played again but with role assignments reversed. Interaction was analysed by means of ratings of altercasting patterns. Significant correlations between assigned role and dimensions of altercasting were found. It was also possible to identify significant components of interpersonal style across roles. Correlations between members of the dyad showed high complementarity in altercasting patterns. Interpersonal tension was resolved chiefly by the re-establishment of exchange of assistance from offender to offended. * This research was supported by a grant from the United States Public Health Service, MH-07181. We wish to thank Professor Mayer Zald for his incisive comments on the initial draft of this paper. This content is only available as a PDF. Copyright © 1966, University of North Carolina Press http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Forces Oxford University Press

Role and Interpersonal Style as Components of Social Interaction

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1966, University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
0037-7732
eISSN
1534-7605
DOI
10.2307/2574391
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Twenty pairs of students role-played a situation in which one friend discovered the other making harmful comments about him to a third party. When completed, the same scene was role-played again but with role assignments reversed. Interaction was analysed by means of ratings of altercasting patterns. Significant correlations between assigned role and dimensions of altercasting were found. It was also possible to identify significant components of interpersonal style across roles. Correlations between members of the dyad showed high complementarity in altercasting patterns. Interpersonal tension was resolved chiefly by the re-establishment of exchange of assistance from offender to offended. * This research was supported by a grant from the United States Public Health Service, MH-07181. We wish to thank Professor Mayer Zald for his incisive comments on the initial draft of this paper. This content is only available as a PDF. Copyright © 1966, University of North Carolina Press

Journal

Social ForcesOxford University Press

Published: Dec 1, 1966

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