Retrospective comparative analysis as a tool for ecological restoration: a case study in a Swedish boreal forest

Retrospective comparative analysis as a tool for ecological restoration: a case study in a... Sweden's boreal forest has experienced radical changes caused by humans since the beginning of industrialization. Ecological structures, such as large trees, dead trees and deciduous trees, have been removed from the forest. Natural processes, like fire, have been suppressed leading to ecosystem degradation, even in forest reserves. Many species that directly or indirectly depend on natural structures and processes are disfavoured and the need for restoration is evident. In this study, the status of a Swedish boreal forest is analysed in the context of biodiversity restoration. Based on ecological qualities of a historic reference state, a restoration gap analysis was produced. This gap analysis provides a method to view forest degradation and measure its deviation from the reference state. Ecological qualities are relatively high in the study area compared with the region, mainly because recent logging in the region did not greatly affect the study area. However, relative to the reference state, the area has lost significant ecological qualities due to earlier human activity. To be successful, strategies for restoring degraded forests should ultimately have landscape level approaches. Therefore, restoration of ecological qualities will not only include reserves but also production forests. In production forests, management strategies should be adapted to the natural functioning of the ecosystem. Consideration of restoration and management aspects during planning and formation of reserves will help ensure long‐term species conservation goals. Methods to restore lost ecological qualities are discussed in the context of re‐introducing fire and producing old‐growth characteristics that predominated in the pre‐industrial period. Copyright Institute of Chartered Foresters 2003 « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Forestry (2003) 76 (2): 243-251. doi: 10.1093/forestry/76.2.243 » Abstract Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Article Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Nordlind, E. Articles by Östlund, L. Search for related content Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue December 2015 88 (5) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Publishers' Books for Review Rights & Permissions Dispatch date of the next issue This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) We are mobile – find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Institute of Chartered Foresters Impact factor: 2.093 5-Yr impact factor: 2.296 Editor-in-Chief Gary Kerr, UK View full editorial board For Authors Instructions to authors Author Self Archiving Policy Online Submission instructions Submit Now! Open access options for authors - visit Oxford Open Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements var taxonomies = ("SCI00870", "SCI01210"); Most Most Read Formal and informal institutions and their hierarchy in the regulation of the forest lease in Russia Nutrient stress predisposes and contributes to sugar maple dieback across its northern range: a review Comparing a top-down and bottom-up approach in the identification of criteria and indicators for sustainable community forest management in Nepal Pests and diseases threatening urban trees under a changing climate The advantages and disadvantages of the application of genetic engineering to forest trees: a discussion » View all Most Read articles Most Cited History, current status and future prospects of uneven-aged forest management in the Dinaric region: an overview Models for predicting wood density of British-grown Sitka spruce Genome-wide responses to drought in forest trees Uneven- vs even-aged management in Finnish boreal forests Taper functions for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) in Northern Britain » View all Most Cited articles Disclaimer: Please note that abstracts for content published before 1996 were created through digital scanning and may therefore not exactly replicate the text of the original print issues. All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, but the Publisher will not be held responsible for any remaining inaccuracies. If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department. Online ISSN 1464-3626 - Print ISSN 0015-752X Copyright © 2015 Institute of Chartered Foresters Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? 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Retrospective comparative analysis as a tool for ecological restoration: a case study in a Swedish boreal forest

Forestry, Volume 76 (2) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Institute of Chartered Foresters
ISSN
0015-752X
eISSN
1464-3626
D.O.I.
10.1093/forestry/76.2.243
Publisher site
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Abstract

Sweden's boreal forest has experienced radical changes caused by humans since the beginning of industrialization. Ecological structures, such as large trees, dead trees and deciduous trees, have been removed from the forest. Natural processes, like fire, have been suppressed leading to ecosystem degradation, even in forest reserves. Many species that directly or indirectly depend on natural structures and processes are disfavoured and the need for restoration is evident. In this study, the status of a Swedish boreal forest is analysed in the context of biodiversity restoration. Based on ecological qualities of a historic reference state, a restoration gap analysis was produced. This gap analysis provides a method to view forest degradation and measure its deviation from the reference state. Ecological qualities are relatively high in the study area compared with the region, mainly because recent logging in the region did not greatly affect the study area. However, relative to the reference state, the area has lost significant ecological qualities due to earlier human activity. To be successful, strategies for restoring degraded forests should ultimately have landscape level approaches. Therefore, restoration of ecological qualities will not only include reserves but also production forests. In production forests, management strategies should be adapted to the natural functioning of the ecosystem. Consideration of restoration and management aspects during planning and formation of reserves will help ensure long‐term species conservation goals. Methods to restore lost ecological qualities are discussed in the context of re‐introducing fire and producing old‐growth characteristics that predominated in the pre‐industrial period. Copyright Institute of Chartered Foresters 2003 « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Forestry (2003) 76 (2): 243-251. doi: 10.1093/forestry/76.2.243 » Abstract Free Full Text (PDF) Free Classifications Article Services Article metrics Alert me when cited Alert me if corrected Find similar articles Similar articles in Web of Science Add to my archive Download citation Request Permissions Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via CrossRef Citing articles via Scopus Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Nordlind, E. Articles by Östlund, L. Search for related content Related Content Load related web page information Share Email this article CiteULike Delicious Facebook Google+ Mendeley Twitter What's this? Search this journal: Advanced » Current Issue December 2015 88 (5) Alert me to new issues The Journal About this journal Publishers' Books for Review Rights & Permissions Dispatch date of the next issue This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) We are mobile – find out more Journals Career Network Published on behalf of The Institute of Chartered Foresters Impact factor: 2.093 5-Yr impact factor: 2.296 Editor-in-Chief Gary Kerr, UK View full editorial board For Authors Instructions to authors Author Self Archiving Policy Online Submission instructions Submit Now! Open access options for authors - visit Oxford Open Alerting Services Email table of contents Email Advance Access CiteTrack XML RSS feed Corporate Services Advertising sales Reprints Supplements var taxonomies = ("SCI00870", "SCI01210"); Most Most Read Formal and informal institutions and their hierarchy in the regulation of the forest lease in Russia Nutrient stress predisposes and contributes to sugar maple dieback across its northern range: a review Comparing a top-down and bottom-up approach in the identification of criteria and indicators for sustainable community forest management in Nepal Pests and diseases threatening urban trees under a changing climate The advantages and disadvantages of the application of genetic engineering to forest trees: a discussion » View all Most Read articles Most Cited History, current status and future prospects of uneven-aged forest management in the Dinaric region: an overview Models for predicting wood density of British-grown Sitka spruce Genome-wide responses to drought in forest trees Uneven- vs even-aged management in Finnish boreal forests Taper functions for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) in Northern Britain » View all Most Cited articles Disclaimer: Please note that abstracts for content published before 1996 were created through digital scanning and may therefore not exactly replicate the text of the original print issues. All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, but the Publisher will not be held responsible for any remaining inaccuracies. If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department. Online ISSN 1464-3626 - Print ISSN 0015-752X Copyright © 2015 Institute of Chartered Foresters Oxford Journals Oxford University Press Site Map Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Legal Notices Frequently Asked Questions Other Oxford University Press sites: Oxford University Press Oxford Journals China Oxford Journals Japan Academic & Professional books Children's & Schools Books Dictionaries & Reference Dictionary of National Biography Digital Reference English Language Teaching Higher Education Textbooks International Education Unit Law Medicine Music Online Products & Publishing Oxford Bibliographies Online Oxford Dictionaries Online Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Language Dictionaries Online Oxford Scholarship Online Reference Rights and Permissions Resources for Retailers & Wholesalers Resources for the Healthcare Industry Very Short Introductions World's Classics function fnc_onDomLoaded() { var query_context = getQueryContext(); PF_initOIUnderbar(query_context,":QS:default","","JRN"); PF_insertOIUnderbar(0); }; if (window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', fnc_onDomLoaded, false); } else if (window.attachEvent) { window.attachEvent('onload', fnc_onDomLoaded); } var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-189672-16"); pageTracker._setDomainName(".oxfordjournals.org"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {}

Journal

ForestryOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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